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The ~200 Line Linux Kernel Patch That Does Wonders

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  • apparently this patch is being included in opensuse 11.4, due in march 2011 with kernel 2.6.37:

    https://features.opensuse.org/310920

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    • Originally posted by R3MF View Post
      apparently this patch is being included in opensuse 11.4, due in march 2011 with kernel 2.6.37:

      https://features.opensuse.org/310920
      yes and i believe theyed built it without the bkl... i have m4 installed and 11.4 seems very promising... could be a awesome version on opensuse.

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      • agreed.

        KDE 4.6
        kernel 2.6.37
        kernel patches
        bretzn app-store
        blue-devil

        i'm looking forward to it.

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        • Ok, what's the difference with :
          nice 10 launch_big_background_job_from_terminal_while_wast ing_time_on_the_web ?!

          Nevertheless I would reaaaally appreciate some improvements in the system responsiveness at high load under linux : the user should NEVER loose the system control (ie mouse, keyboard responsiveness) whatever the load is. Better stop or renice big processes...

          On my 5 year old laptop I'm frequently stuck with IO load issues : consider monotasking when updating packages...

          While watching DVB, if I ever hit 100% ram usage, vlc starts swapping, system freezes and I have to wait 5-10 min for full swap, killed processes and back to normal use :-/

          Hope this patch is a first step to improve responsiveness under Linux !

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          • Originally posted by blaze33 View Post
            While watching DVB, if I ever hit 100% ram usage, vlc starts swapping, system freezes and I have to wait 5-10 min for full swap, killed processes and back to normal use :-/

            Hope this patch is a first step to improve responsiveness under Linux !
            I hear ya! It's a little weird though. It did not use to be like this in the first half or so of the decade. Did we all move to laptops with crappy IO and/or did the kernel change for the worse in terms of responsiveness?

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            • Originally posted by rekiah View Post
              Con has abandoned the whole "automatic task grouping per TTY" idea. On October 6 he released his patch for BFS. 1 month later he said:

              [...]
              Proving how many un-niced jobs you can throw at your kernel compiles is not a measure of one's prowess. It is just a mindless test.
              I fully agree with Con on that one. Making an already complex scheduler more complex (and be it by 200 lines only) by introducing heuristics is the wrong way. The user space (read: the distro!) should make the choice. For instance, in my .profile and .bashrc it says:

              Code:
              if [ "$TERM" = "xterm" ]; then
                renice 19 $$ > /dev/null
              fi
              That is my personal choice to deal with all compilation work and other background tasks started from an xterm while preserving full interactivity using BFS. But whatever the mechanism, the distro plays the role of the OS (whereas the kernel is just, well, the kernel) and should deliver it out of the box.

              On a related note: something I dislike about the kernel developers' attitude is how the arguments are twisted. When it was about kicking out devfs, the mantra was "policy doesn't belong in the kernel". Now it is almost the opposite, because "user space is a mess". But I guess that is what you get from a model based on benevolent dictatorship (quote by Linus Torvalds).

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              • amazing

                this patch is unbelievably hot. On my laptop with a crappy intel gma 965 gfx card, I can now watch 1080p hd videos with full 60 frames with an extra stress of 80 % cpu usage. Before, I had to turn every process off to do that. Also, it really gave a noticeable increase in all my opengl apps. The bottom line is that this patch is amazing.

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                • Originally posted by korpenkraxar View Post
                  I hear ya! It's a little weird though. It did not use to be like this in the first half or so of the decade. Did we all move to laptops with crappy IO and/or did the kernel change for the worse in terms of responsiveness?
                  Our data consumables have increased.

                  The videos we watch and even the web pages we browse to (thanks to Flash) are relatively more taxing to CPU and IO

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                  • if you just want faster flash, then you can download google chrome and this addon for chrome: https://chrome.google.com/extensions...jgigdoeoanimeh
                    basically, it forces youtube to play videos in html5, and not flash, which IMHO is a lot faster on linux that is. but, the quality is a little more pixelated, nothing noticable though.

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                    • also, i noticed that bfs is a lot faster if you download pre-patched zen kernel from git repository and change zen-tune profile to desktop, enable sched_iso policy for x, and with timer frequency set to 1500 hz, yes you heard me right 1500 hz. now, that does miracles, at least on my laptop. on my desktop with i7, i can barely notice any improvements between the two; almost identical. but this patch works better under extremely heavy load. so to sum it up,
                      bfs: amazing multitasking from low-medium cpu usage + overall performance boost (at least graphics are faster). although any more than 16 cores makes this scheduler useless.
                      this patch: not noticable unless you got an extremely cpu-intensive task such as compiling or running 50 firefox tabs with all of them running 1080p videos (ok not really but you get the idea).

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