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Linux 6.10 Adds eDP/DisplayPort Support For The Snapdragon X Elite

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  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by IverCoder View Post

    Here's an article thoroughly explaining Google Requirements Freeze. Basically, it lets SOC manufacturers slack off their job and, in turn, force OEMs to ship phones that are already EOL at launch day. A clusterfuck of issues that could've been avoided if every SOCs and OEMs just manned up and mainlined all of their phones to Torvalds' tree before launching them.
    Thanks for the read.

    I think with some companies this may be changing, i.e. Qualcomm right now is aggressively upstreaming changes to Linux for the snapdragon x elite chip which is a refreshing change.

    Leave a comment:


  • IverCoder
    replied
    Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

    What is GRF?
    Here's an article thoroughly explaining Google Requirements Freeze. Basically, it lets SOC manufacturers slack off their job and, in turn, force OEMs to ship phones that are already EOL at launch day. A clusterfuck of issues that could've been avoided if every SOCs and OEMs just manned up and mainlined all of their phones to Torvalds' tree before launching them.
    The Google Requirements Freeze program is an incredibly important change to the way Android updates work. Here's what you need to know.

    Leave a comment:


  • ehansin
    replied
    Originally posted by timofonic View Post
    I don't care so much about CPU architecture, but x86 compatibility is a plus. ARM is a mess because not full Linux mainline support plus proprietary drivers everywhere, even UEFI is good compared to ARM situation. I have enough shit with Android mobile phones, making root difficult and using ancient Linux kernel forks with tons of binary blobs.
    I get what you are saying. But happy if anything ARM-based shows up that is well supported and can provide some value and/or advantages. I will say, did an Asahi install on a couple M1-based Apple computers at work just as a test and was super slick. This all said, if AMD or Intel can provide, happy with that also.

    Leave a comment:


  • mdedetrich
    replied
    Originally posted by edxposed View Post
    None of this has anything to do with Android. Thanks to GRF, no functional kernel, driver and firmware updates are available for any non-Pixel device, in other words, the device is EOL when it's released.
    What is GRF?

    Leave a comment:


  • timofonic
    replied
    Originally posted by ehansin View Post
    I for one am happy to see some quality ARM-based offerings being well supported in the kernel. I am writing this right now from a 2017 Air with a 5th Gen i7 and 8 GB of RAM. Sounds pretty weak these days, but a great laptop for how I use it (and yes, runs macOS in this case.) Solid build, quiet most of the time, and a great fit for my backpack. To add here, I don't care if it is ARM or x86, but I'd love to see some processors that can provide fully passive cooling of laptops (yes, the above is not this) without fear of overheating. I don't need to maximum performance for many usage cases at the expense this for example, which by extension would also mean long battery life. I get that in some case we want maximum computing performance, but sometimes other factors can be of greater importance, especially in these days when things are pretty darn fast anyway. Would be nice to see both ends catered for. Anyway, not sure what I am getting at but made me think of this. Performant ARM may be a good fit for this space, and also push AMD and Intel to up their game.
    I don't care so much about CPU architecture, but x86 compatibility is a plus. ARM is a mess because not full Linux mainline support plus proprietary drivers everywhere, even UEFI is good compared to ARM situation. I have enough shit with Android mobile phones, making root difficult and using ancient Linux kernel forks with tons of binary blobs.

    Leave a comment:


  • ehansin
    replied
    I for one am happy to see some quality ARM-based offerings being well supported in the kernel. I am writing this right now from a 2017 Air with a 5th Gen i7 and 8 GB of RAM. Sounds pretty weak these days, but a great laptop for how I use it (and yes, runs macOS in this case.) Solid build, quiet most of the time, and a great fit for my backpack.

    To add here, I don't care if it is ARM or x86, but I'd love to see some processors that can provide fully passive cooling of laptops (yes, the above is not this) without fear of overheating. I don't need to maximum performance for many usage cases at the expense this for example, which by extension would also mean long battery life. I get that in some case we want maximum computing performance, but sometimes other factors can be of greater importance, especially in these days when things are pretty darn fast anyway.

    Would be nice to see both ends catered for. Anyway, not sure what I am getting at but made me think of this. Performant ARM may be a good fit for this space, and also push AMD and Intel to up their game.
    Last edited by ehansin; 21 May 2024, 10:43 PM. Reason: grammer was attrocious, just the whole writing as well - had to clean it up!

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  • timofonic
    replied
    This is contaminated with offtopic...

    Leave a comment:


  • NateHubbard
    replied
    Originally posted by dlq84 View Post

    How does your comments relate to this article?
    And more importantly, what does any of that even mean?

    Leave a comment:


  • NateHubbard
    replied
    Originally posted by edxposed View Post
    Thanks to GRF, no functional kernel, driver and firmware updates are available for any non-Pixel device, in other words, the device is EOL when it's released.
    I thought the whole point of the freeze was so you could guarantee three additional versions of Android would be supported?

    Leave a comment:


  • dlq84
    replied
    Originally posted by elbar View Post
    Seen as good idea but Google is somehow related on Android with Rust code and Samsung has sometimes ideas for image(and more importantly Samsung Apps) to be available on monitors and his effort for Linux on phones is commercially unsuccessful but who knows when his laptops are competition for Chromebooks on Asian markets, but maybe not so affordable with policies for schools buy in ...

    Samsung have their own apps store but seems as Gaming is All-In and some connection with MS Pay is prohibited by the Google Email Act on mandatory ActiveGoogleDirectory android integration and it seems that regulation is needed but in MS phone division and countries business markets.
    How does your comments relate to this article?

    Leave a comment:

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