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Rust-Written LAVD Kernel Scheduler Shows Promising Results For Linux Gaming

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  • #11
    Looks like the meat of the scheduler is actually written in C:
    sched_ext schedulers and tools. Contribute to sched-ext/scx development by creating an account on GitHub.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Mathias View Post
      Go ahead, write the same thing in C if you want. But the devs chose BPF, because it has benefits.
      The real question is, what percentage is the developer and what percentage is the language.

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      • #13
        Implemented as a BPF scheduler
        I already hate it. That's like using Javascript to render a web page.

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        • #14
          Wait, this article is pretty similar to a different one from a few months ago.

          This article: Rust-Written LAVD Kernel Scheduler Shows Promising Results For Linux Gaming

          Previous article: Rust-Written Linux Scheduler Showing Promising Results For Gaming Performance

          I don't think they're talking about the same thing, either. The first one was called "scx_rustland" and this one is called "LAVD".

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          • #15
            Originally posted by Shnatsel View Post
            Yeah. If you look at the slide deck, the average FPS increases from 25 to 32, which is a 32% increase. That's massive, equivalent to a hardware upgrade indeed.

            It is likely that this is only a single workload that benefits this much, but even a 5% bump on average would be significant.
            So, there are a couple of workloads that are similar to gaming that can benefit from this. Game creation is on, Video creation, 3D modeling and sculpting all fall under this type of prioritization.

            I wouldn't mind seeing this tries on one purpose servers, either. For example, a web server whose sole role is web serving, could it benefit from such prioritization?

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Mathias View Post

              We don't *need* them. But from the slides:[/LIST][/LIST]Go ahead, write the same thing in C if you want. But the devs chose BPF, because it has benefits.
              They wrote it in Rust and Linux already accepted Rust

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              • #17
                Originally posted by EphemeralEft View Post
                Wait, this article is pretty similar to a different one from a few months ago.

                This article: Rust-Written LAVD Kernel Scheduler Shows Promising Results For Linux Gaming

                Previous article: Rust-Written Linux Scheduler Showing Promising Results For Gaming Performance

                I don't think they're talking about the same thing, either. The first one was called "scx_rustland" and this one is called "LAVD".
                they are similar. Both are scx schedulers. both are even in the same repo. you can swap between the two of them, see below

                Originally posted by Kjell View Post
                I find sched_ext schedulers confusing as they're supposedly loaded on demand instead of being the main scheduler (from my limited understanding)..

                Could you share the steps to make it work correctly with Arch Linux?
                you install a compatible kernel. then you install the schedulers. your scheduler will be EEVDF until you start an scx scheduler. then they take over. install guide on the git repo https://github.com/sched-ext/scx/blo....md#arch-linux is the best way. However I don't like using other repos since they can interefere with the AUR so I do

                #Only need one or the other kernel

                install scx capable kernel
                sudo pacman -U https://aur.cachyos.org/repo/x86_64/...64.pkg.tar.zst https://aur.cachyos.org/repo/x86_64/...64.pkg.tar.zst

                install cachyos kernels, note that these are different from the install guide. They are not vanilla kernels with the patches applied on top
                sudo pacman -U https://aur.cachyos.org/repo/x86_64/...64.pkg.tar.zst https://aur.cachyos.org/repo/x86_64/...64.pkg.tar.zst

                ##once installed then install schdulers, you can either get them from cachyOS like above, or get them from the AUR
                paru -S https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/scx-scheds-git
                After this it's just a matter of rebooting to the scx capable kernel. then you can run one of the schedulers, your options are below, I reccomend trying LAVD and Rustland first, but you can literally try any of them, these are executable binaries, just ctrl+c to stop the scheduler, and start a new one.
                Code:
                scx_central   scx_flatcg    scx_lavd      scx_layered   scx_nest      scx_pair      scx_qmap      scx_rlfifo    scx_rustland  scx_rusty     scx_simple    scx_userland
                ‚Äč

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                • #18
                  unapproved T.T

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by EphemeralEft View Post
                    Wait, this article is pretty similar to a different one from a few months ago.

                    This article: Rust-Written LAVD Kernel Scheduler Shows Promising Results For Linux Gaming

                    Previous article: Rust-Written Linux Scheduler Showing Promising Results For Gaming Performance

                    I don't think they're talking about the same thing, either. The first one was called "scx_rustland" and this one is called "LAVD".
                    The full name for this is scx_lavd. It and scx_rustland are just some of the many SCX Rust Schedulers.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by EphemeralEft View Post

                      I already hate it. That's like using Javascript to render a web page.
                      Everyone hates it. Better then the native schedulers, no memory corruption, live reload, .... Why is this technology so good? It should be banned. Like Javascript from webpages. How dare people put interactive stuff on the web?

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