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Pingora 0.1 Released As Cloudflare's Rust Code For Reliable & Fast Networked Systems

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  • Pingora 0.1 Released As Cloudflare's Rust Code For Reliable & Fast Networked Systems

    Phoronix: Pingora 0.1 Released As Cloudflare's Rust Code For Reliable & Fast Networked Systems

    Back in 2022 Cloudflare began talking about replacing Nginx with their own in-house, Rust-written code called Pingora, talked about Pingora more in 2023, and then this past February made this Pingora framework open-source for creating reliable and fast networked systems. Today marks the first official release of Pingora with the v0.1 tag...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    I don't doubt Cloudflare's engineering skills nor their contribution, but a version number 0.1 and say it's production ready confuses me.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sethox View Post
      I don't doubt Cloudflare's engineering skills nor their contribution, but a version number 0.1 and say it's production ready confuses me.
      Software's most popular versioning scheme!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Sethox View Post
        I don't doubt Cloudflare's engineering skills nor their contribution, but a version number 0.1 and say it's production ready confuses me.
        The confusion will go away the moment you realize 0.1.0 is mostly just a label.

        What confuses me is what Pingora actually is. The GitHub page seems to suggest is more like a framework for building up a server rather than a standalone product, like nginx it replaces. But that would mean Couldflare didn't replace nginx with Pingora, but with something Pingora-powered.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bug77 View Post

          The confusion will go away the moment you realize 0.1.0 is mostly just a label.

          What confuses me is what Pingora actually is. The GitHub page seems to suggest is more like a framework for building up a server rather than a standalone product, like nginx it replaces. But that would mean Couldflare didn't replace nginx with Pingora, but with something Pingora-powered.
          Yes, they are pretty clear about that. The first line in the Readme says ‚Äč

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Julius View Post
            I do have to agree with Sethox, as despite using some of the programs listed I wasn't even aware of this type of versioning.
            I get the incentive (some programs have gotten insane versioning like Chrome and Firefox being at 123 and 124 for their stable releases respectively) and I get the meme but this just shifts the problem one digit to right behind the decimal. Additionally using "0." to indicate that the code is still in full on development is something that I picked up in college and I would assume is pretty common for others that use semantic versioning, which doesn't just disappear meaning you need to be aware if a program is using 0ver or is just in initial development.

            And if the point is that I can't exceed 0, can I start with a negative number? -1 now becomes the indicator for initial development or hell use it as a count down to scare the shit out of people when it starts to approach 0.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post

              The confusion will go away the moment you realize 0.1.0 is mostly just a label.

              What confuses me is what Pingora actually is. The GitHub page seems to suggest is more like a framework for building up a server rather than a standalone product, like nginx it replaces. But that would mean Couldflare didn't replace nginx with Pingora, but with something Pingora-powered.
              my interpetation of this is correct, They do have examples for a load balancer and a proxy, but if you want a real nginx you will need to make one yourself it looks like

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
                my interpetation of this is correct, They do have examples for a load balancer and a proxy, but if you want a real nginx you will need to make one yourself it looks like
                That's how I understood the project as well, I'm so accustomed to the prospect of a config file, but with this project we need to program it (with Rust) to do what we need it to do. The simple examples on their documentation leans towards that.

                I guess you can call it "scripting" to what you need it to be/do but in a more objective sense, it's definitely a different approach.

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                • #9
                  Hope it will get support for Let'sEncrypt's Certbot, either officially through certbot or through a 3rd party plugin.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sethox View Post

                    That's how I understood the project as well, I'm so accustomed to the prospect of a config file, but with this project we need to program it (with Rust) to do what we need it to do. The simple examples on their documentation leans towards that.

                    I guess you can call it "scripting" to what you need it to be/do but in a more objective sense, it's definitely a different approach.
                    Since your config file is technically compiled, it should be way faster (because the rust compiler can do a whole range of mad optimizations around what you wrote in your "config").

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