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  • cj.wijtmans
    replied
    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

    There's not much sun in Oregon during the winters (about 25% of what they get in summer), although of course he could buy tons of extra panels if he wanted to.

    But skipping a week like this isn't a big deal to anyone. He's done it before based on holidays or vacations, and nobody cares. Doing it because of a storm doesn't matter to anyone either.
    there is barely sun here most of the year. the solar panels work fine, if not better, because they will last longer. If you work your solar panels at peak in the heat they wont last, without cooling. most solar panel systems dont come with cooling.
    Last edited by cj.wijtmans; 16 January 2024, 10:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

    Over here there is a separation between those two, every employer is forced by law to pay a certain percentage of your salary to the government retirement fund and that is part of the "social fees" paid by the employer that most people don't see since they are seldom reported on your salary/tax reports. But then most companies also pay extra somewhat similar to a 401k (usually mandated by the labour union agreements) that you also can pay privately to if you choose, but never heard about companies matching your investment.
    Yeah, in The States nearly every company worth its salt will offer matching contributions to a 401k, that you can roll over to a new employer or a private IRA when you leave, and many companies now also fully fund your insurance, like medical, dental, eye, instead of it coming from your salary.

    When you start looking at some of the union jobs, like civil service, police, fire, etc, that's when it gets really crazy because you start also getting the pension plans that can be very lucrative.

    This is why the claim Linus "only" makes 700k a year is misleading, that extra million bucks is his money, and the way 401k work or private IRA, you invest invest the money into various money market funds or you can even buy stocks, bonds. treasury bills, a million dollars a year principle can easily turn into the estimated 50 million that he is reportedly worth.

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    In the United States you do not count money contributed to a 401k retirement account as part of the salary normally, but there are numerous nuances.

    For instance, at a company I used to work you were allowed to put up to 9% of your salary pre-tax into the company 401k every pay check and the company would make matching contributions up to 50% of what you contributed.

    Other companies would match 100% of your contributions up to 9% of your salary.

    Then you have how long before the money is vested, i.e. yours, some companies the money is vested day one, other companies after a 90 trial period, other companies after 1 year of service.

    But here's the practical reality, if you are offer two jobs, they both pay the same, say 100k a year, the first job will deposit 10k a year into a retirement account for you and the other will deposit 100k a year for you.

    Which job do you take?
    Over here there is a separation between those two, every employer is forced by law to pay a certain percentage of your salary to the government retirement fund and that is part of the "social fees" paid by the employer that most people don't see since they are seldom reported on your salary/tax reports. But then most companies also pay extra somewhat similar to a 401k (usually mandated by the labour union agreements) that you also can pay privately to if you choose, but never heard about companies matching your investment.

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post
    There is a more detailed breakdown a bit down in their tax returns where the heading for this is "(C) Retirement and other deferred compensation​" and that contains the $1M. Now I don't know about the US but over here in most parts of Europe you never count the part that is put away for your retirement as part of you salary, most people don't even know what their numbers are (since it's something the employer pays directly to the state and not to you directly).
    In the United States you do not count money contributed to a 401k retirement account as part of the salary normally, but there are numerous nuances.

    For instance, at a company I used to work you were allowed to put up to 9% of your salary pre-tax into the company 401k every pay check and the company would make matching contributions up to 50% of what you contributed.

    Other companies would match 100% of your contributions up to 9% of your salary.

    Then you have how long before the money is vested, i.e. yours, some companies the money is vested day one, other companies after a 90 trial period, other companies after 1 year of service.

    But here's the practical reality, if you are offer two jobs, they both pay the same, say 100k a year, the first job will deposit 10k a year into a retirement account for you and the other will deposit 100k a year for you.

    Which job do you take?

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    You are correct, i looked at the line above his name that said CFO, not realizing it was referring to Stephanie.

    Regarding the compensation, read the form carefully, the 700k is listed under "Reportable compensation from the organization (W-2/1099-MISC/1099-NEC)" and the million bucks is listed under "Estimated amount of other compensation from the organization and related organizations", where do you see the word "retirement"?

    But for the sake of argument, let's say the million bucks is put in a retirement account, he is still earning 1.7 million year.

    You can put up to 19 grand a year into a retirement account tax free (until you start drawing it) and putting large sums of money into a retirement account is a known strategy to make yourself judgement proof. OJ Simpson famously avoided paying that judgement for killing those people because all his money was put into a retirement account before he was sued.

    And if you need, you can always take out up to 50% of the amount in the retirement account as a loan to yourself.

    So i don't think that extra million is for retirement, but even if it is, he's still making 1.7 million a year.
    There is a more detailed breakdown a bit down in their tax returns where the heading for this is "(C) Retirement and other deferred compensation​" and that contains the $1M. Now I don't know about the US but over here in most parts of Europe you never count the part that is put away for your retirement as part of you salary, most people don't even know what their numbers are (since it's something the employer pays directly to the state and not to you directly).

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post
    Where did you get CFO from (the CFO is Stephanie Wigle Haddow)? Every single post in their tax returns marks him as "Fellow" and nothing more. And the $1M is, as you can see under the heading, deferred for retirement so that is not money he have access to now but that is instead put away for his future retirement.

    So yes the idea that he "basically owns The Linux Foundation" is nothing mere than unsubstantiated rumours still.
    You are correct, i looked at the line above his name that said CFO, not realizing it was referring to Stephanie.

    Regarding the compensation, read the form carefully, the 700k is listed under "Reportable compensation from the organization (W-2/1099-MISC/1099-NEC)" and the million bucks is listed under "Estimated amount of other compensation from the organization and related organizations", where do you see the word "retirement"?

    But for the sake of argument, let's say the million bucks is put in a retirement account, he is still earning 1.7 million year.

    You can put up to 19 grand a year into a retirement account tax free (until you start drawing it) and putting large sums of money into a retirement account is a known strategy to make yourself judgement proof. OJ Simpson famously avoided paying that judgement for killing those people because all his money was put into a retirement account before he was sued.

    And if you need, you can always take out up to 50% of the amount in the retirement account as a loan to yourself.

    So i don't think that extra million is for retirement, but even if it is, he's still making 1.7 million a year.

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    Here is the actual filing from 2022:

    Since 2013, the IRS has released data culled from millions of nonprofit tax filings. Use this database to find organizations and see details like their executive compensation, revenue and expenses, as well as download tax filings going back as far as 2001.


    Since 2013, the IRS has released data culled from millions of nonprofit tax filings. Use this database to find organizations and see details like their executive compensation, revenue and expenses, as well as download tax filings going back as far as 2001.


    Linux holds the title of Chief Financial Officer and get paid $700,331 under "reportable compensation from the corporation" and $1,044,650 under "estimated amount of other compensation".

    That's 1.7 million dollars in 2022.

    The "rumors" come from the official tax filing that the Linux Foundation files every year.






    Where did you get CFO from (the CFO is Stephanie Wigle Haddow)? Every single post in their tax returns marks him as "Fellow" and nothing more. And the $1M is, as you can see under the heading, deferred for retirement so that is not money he have access to now but that is instead put away for his future retirement.

    So yes the idea that he "basically owns The Linux Foundation" is nothing mere than unsubstantiated rumours still.

    Leave a comment:


  • agd5f
    replied
    Originally posted by mozin View Post

    What i'm struggling to understand is that there is CPPC option in BIOS and its not working or providing the advertised functionality.

    Whether it is ASUS, ASROCK, MSI, GIGABYTE etc. not a single commercial TRX40 motherboard has this capability working.

    It seems AMD don't have any quality control over its products especially for HEDT (X399-TRX40) platform. We have seen it on AM4 which has all advertised features. However TRX40 is completely ignored. Whats the point of advertising this feature for Zen 2 while none of the end users can enable it on TRX40?

    Briefly, CPPC is supported on Zen2*.

    *Please contact to your motherboard manufacturer for CPPC compability. We have done it in our inhouse motherboard but we dont care about the rest.
    CPPC is an ACPI feature. There are no CPU dependencies per se. Zen2 was the first CPU generation where the ACPI support was available in an AMD reference design. AMD doesn't implement the bios directly for OEMs. In most cases the OEM doesn't actually implement the bios for their platform, they work with a third party bios vendor (AMI, Insyde, etc.) to develop the bios for their platforms. AMD provides a reference platform and bios and the OEMs and bios vendors take it from there and they chose what features they want to productize on each of their parts. It would not be practical for the CPU vendor to own the bios for every OEM system out there. There is too much variation.

    Leave a comment:


  • mozin
    replied
    Originally posted by agd5f View Post

    What should AMD fix? The CRB is the reference board used for feature development and provided to OEMs as a reference platform. The CRB supports CPPC functionality. The functionality is there if the OEMs want it.
    What i'm struggling to understand is that there is CPPC option in BIOS and its not working or providing the advertised functionality.

    Whether it is ASUS, ASROCK, MSI, GIGABYTE etc. not a single commercial TRX40 motherboard has this capability working.

    It seems AMD don't have any quality control over its products especially for HEDT (X399-TRX40) platform. We have seen it on AM4 which has all advertised features. However TRX40 is completely ignored. Whats the point of advertising this feature for Zen 2 while none of the end users can enable it on TRX40?

    Briefly, CPPC is supported on Zen2*.

    *Please contact to your motherboard manufacturer for CPPC compability. We have done it in our inhouse motherboard but we dont care about the rest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Old Grouch
    replied
    Originally posted by sophisticles View Post

    This is an interesting point. I;m sure there are probably lots if half-assed hacks in Windows and Windows related products, and the same thing with Apple software, just like we have that big half-assed project known as Gnome.

    Here's the difference, the Linux faithful are like the Donald Trump of software, "everything was perfect, everyone said so, my testimony was the most perfect they had ever see, there were zero flaws, it was all great, fantastic".

    That's Linux proponents, there's no bugs, even when Linux himself says there's bugs, everything is perfect, it wins every benchmark, except when it doesn't it's because the tester did something wrong, and it just goes on.
    I'm certain a lot of people won't like your point.

    I use Linux by choice as my daily driver, and have done so for well over a decade (before then, I was forced to use other operating systems for the majority of my time), but I am not blind to the many 'embuggerances' that can be found. I am happy for the continual improvement, even though sometimes it feels like progress is a random walk.

    I'm glad Linux exists. And GNU. And other choices. It is fine to have 'robust', but polite, discussions about the attributes of different choices. People can have good reasons for having different opinions.

    Leave a comment:

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