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systemd 255 Released With A "Blue Screen of Death" For Linux Systems

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  • #21
    Your computers hang?

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    • #22
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      Ideally, they'd come out with some sort of protocol for init systems and service managers to target so they'd be a little more plug-and-play, swappable, with each other.
      Thanks, I agree that a modular approach would be cool. Even if just for Linux distros but especially for all Unix-like operating systems.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by andyprough View Post
        Lennart is being paid by Microsoft to make desktop GNU/Linux more like Windows. So you might as well get used to this type of nonsense. Next up will be 'systemd-clippy', and 'systemd-cortana'.
        I was talking to a group of BSD users on a mailing list after Michael posted this article and I used this term: Linux, especially Linux with SystemD, is becoming a multitool. You know also known as a swiss army knife. Sometimes I just need a really good screwdriver, or torque wrench, or a 13mm socket, or what have you. I don't need a magnifying glass, a bottle cap opener, and a tiny hard to use screw driver.

        Linux, admittedly does a very good job of it, tries to be a jack of all trades- a multitool. The OS for super computers, cloud web servers, desktops, laptops, and even embedded systems. Like I said it does a good job of this but one tool can not be all things.

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        • #24
          Rotflmao!!!

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          • #25
            Originally posted by andyprough View Post
            Lennart is being paid by Microsoft to make desktop GNU/Linux more like Windows. So you might as well get used to this type of nonsense. Next up will be 'systemd-clippy', and 'systemd-cortana'.
            The truth that many people will rather die than admit it is that there are many things that Windows got right, and that being "more like windows" can often be an improvement over the classic vi/sh/grep/awk Rube-Goldberg systems. I seriously doubt that anyone would seriously develop systemd-clippy, but a systemd-cortana could be great or terrible, depending on how it's implemented.
            Last edited by jacob; 06 December 2023, 11:53 PM.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by jacob View Post
              there are many things that Windows got right
              No, they pretty much have tried their best to imprison humanity in a walled garden. Same as Apple. But nice try.

              Some prisons can seem like they have nice features or pretty colors though.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by andyprough View Post

                No, they pretty much have tried their best to imprison humanity in a walled garden. Same as Apple. But nice try.

                Some prisons can seem like they have nice features or pretty colors though.
                let Amen: i32 = 9000; // Immutable bindings​
                Last edited by onlyLinuxLuvUBack; 07 December 2023, 12:58 AM. Reason: forgot to comment the code

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                • #28
                  Yeah, but when is systemd-gpf going to be released? Some of us are nostalgic for Windows 3.x

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
                    SO MANY features get rolled into this project. New keywords for service files even when there already existed a whole bagful. Honestly, almost no-one knows how to correctly write a systemd service file that does exactly what is wanted. There are 5 methods to do the same thing, but they differ slightly in behavior in some edge case, and it usually takes a discussion thread of like 5 experienced systemd users and several days of brainstorming to achieve a "final" consensus how some non-trivial service file should be written. WTF?

                    I managed pretty well to live with cron and shell scripts under sysV. With systemd i can only hope google brings me to the right discussion thread for the type of service i need...
                    Shell based service managers are terrible. Restarting a service in exactly the same way it came up at boot is impossible because the script inherits your environment variables. Systemd may not be perfect but it solves that problem and it is a hell of a lot better than upstart. I have an old synology nas that uses upstart, and adding my own init script was a clusterfuck

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                      Ideally, they'd come out with some sort of protocol for init systems and service managers to target so they'd be a little more plug-and-play, swappable, with each other.
                      What would you swap in instead?

                      Systemd-the-init uses and tries to expose Linux kernel features in a convenient way. Systemd-the-project then builds tools exposing more Linux kernel features, built on top of the features exposed in the lower levels of the stack, all the way down to systemd-the-init.

                      Competing init systems are trying to be smaller, expose less functionality in the init process itself and to rely on standard POSIX features only to be useable on kernels other than Linux. So they lack features most of the tools in systemd-the-project depend on, effectively making much of the systemd-the-project tools only work on systemd-the-init.

                      One could implement the needed infrastructure on top of any init system in some Linux-specific layer, but so I have not seen anyone try recently. Ubuntu did it for a while for parts of the systemd-the-project stack when they were not yet using systemd, so it is definitely possible. Somebody that likes systemd-the-project, but hates systemd-the-init would be needed to write such a layer, but you are not likely to find many such people.

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