Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Linux 6.7 Merge Window Is Massive With Many New Features

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • rogerx
    replied
    Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

    I doubt that would be enough grounds to remove it.



    I not sure anyone wants to remove them, I havent seen anyone advocate for that, disabling it by default however is for sure something people want​

    Nor have I really seen any effort for removing virtual terminals, pretty much a backbone or workhorse feature of/for Linux/GNU.

    However, I certainly would not want a Wayland/Systemd user having access to such a powerful feature! Simply locking-down or hardening the kernel should work? If I'm not mistaken, seen some Ubuntu operating systems significant disabling of virtual terminals... shrugs.

    Seriously, should probably be a feature/function/lock-out only enabled once the operating system is successfully installed, and the user/admin clicks harden/lock-out features/functions. Wouldn't want such a lock-out activated during install, unless and admin rolls/creates his own operating system install with site specific packages/functions.

    Leave a comment:


  • oleid
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post

    Yes, and have the machinery to specify that process. And before that, detect that userspace is fucked/stalled. And mop it up before spawning new.
    Well, it could be a statically linked binary that the kernel manages. I mean, how do micro kernel operating systems handle it.

    When alternative is to have a simple (or extensive) console in kernel that can always be accessed unless the kernel has experienced memory corruption.
    Consoles are less simple than one thinks. And they provide an interface to the outside world. That's better hardened.

    I wonder what kind of Linux using person has never had to switch to kernel console to rectify things going wrong in userspace.
    Oh, I regularly use the console. But if things really go wrong, I'm using a serial interface.
    Userspace is typically not the problem. And I've never seen PID1 crash.

    Leave a comment:


  • varikonniemi
    replied
    Originally posted by oleid View Post

    Technically, the kernel could launch a userspace process.
    Yes, and have the machinery to specify that process. And before that, detect that userspace is fucked/stalled. And mop it up before spawning new.

    When alternative is to have a simple (or extensive) console in kernel that can always be accessed unless the kernel has experienced memory corruption.

    I wonder what kind of Linux using person has never had to switch to kernel console to rectify things going wrong in userspace.

    Leave a comment:


  • ehansin
    replied
    Thanks everyone for the VT discussion, I'm learning stuff here. I read the Reddit post and comments. Sounds like differences in opinion, different wants and needs. Decisions here are above my pay grade, so nothing in my control. But at least I now understand things better whatever happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • oleid
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post

    How is that done if init is dead and you cannot launch another one using kernel console?
    Technically, the kernel could launch a userspace process.

    Leave a comment:


  • varikonniemi
    replied
    Originally posted by oleid View Post

    Userspace can get restarted.
    How is that done if init is dead and you cannot launch another one using kernel console?

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by rogerx View Post

    The only reason in-kernel or virtual terminals will be removed is if Wayland/systemd developers and/or RedHat/Ubuntu demand it's removal.

    Now with that stated, I'm pretty sure there will be more serious efforts for virtual terminals complete removal, since it's a successful competing function with Microsoft Windows. ( ... and we cannot have Linux looking and working better than Windows!)

    As for I, I'm always resorting to virtual terminals on a daily bases, for working around HDMI bugs and all things recently created within the past decade or so. Else, I would reboot like Windows.

    If I could, I'd live entire days within a virtual terminal. I used to do so, a decade ago! Currently, I run graphical desktops atop of the virtual terminals, granted most other Linux users do so too, but with the terminal interface hidden from typical users.
    I doubt that would be enough grounds to remove it.

    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    I find it pretty sad that the in-kernel console is being removed. There should be a way to interact with the kernel even if userspace blows up.
    I not sure anyone wants to remove them, I havent seen anyone advocate for that, disabling it by default however is for sure something people want​

    Leave a comment:


  • darkbasic
    replied
    Did the AMD Preferred Core patches made their way into 6.7?

    Leave a comment:


  • rogerx
    replied
    Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
    I find it pretty sad that the in-kernel console is being removed. There should be a way to interact with the kernel even if userspace blows up.
    The only reason in-kernel or virtual terminals will be removed is if Wayland/systemd developers and/or RedHat/Ubuntu demand it's removal.

    Now with that stated, I'm pretty sure there will be more serious efforts for virtual terminals complete removal, since it's a successful competing function with Microsoft Windows. ( ... and we cannot have Linux looking and working better than Windows!)

    As for I, I'm always resorting to virtual terminals on a daily bases, for working around HDMI bugs and all things recently created within the past decade or so. Else, I would reboot like Windows.

    If I could, I'd live entire days within a virtual terminal. I used to do so, a decade ago! Currently, I run graphical desktops atop of the virtual terminals, granted most other Linux users do so too, but with the terminal interface hidden from typical users.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarkFoss
    replied
    Hopefully CoreCtrl will work correctly with the 7900 cards.
    Please, follow the Issues writing guidelines. CoreCtrl version: 1.3.1 Distribution: Fedora Kernel version: 6.1.5 GPU model: Red Devil 7900 XTX...

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X