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SELinux In Linux 6.6 Removes References To Its Origins At The US NSA

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  • Iksf
    replied
    If the plan is to shut up the crazies.... I expect this will backfire

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  • cynic
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post
    It's a bad technology anyway. They may as well just drop it altogether rather than only dropping the NSA reference. It's bad because it's over complicated, and when something is over complicated it leaves room for mistakes that result in security holes. I remember needing to turn it off whenever I needed to test my web server back in the days when I was using Fedora before getting fed up with SELinux and jumping distros.
    if it's over complicated for you, you can disable it.


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  • Duff~
    replied
    Nice try NSA.

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  • archkde
    replied
    Originally posted by rclark View Post
    Doesn't make sense to me. NSA was the original author, and yes SEL has changed over the years, but the original authors still should be referenced. Strange world we live in now though as history is being rewritten, and in some cases erased.
    This just doesn't make sense, it's not "Immunix AppArmor" or "NTT Tomoyo" either.

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  • espi
    replied
    Originally posted by rclark View Post
    Doesn't make sense to me. NSA was the original author, and yes SEL has changed over the years, but the original authors still should be referenced. Strange world we live in now though as history is being rewritten, and in some cases erased.
    Everything will be tracked forever by git anyways. Technically the story could be rewritten, but its not the case.

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  • Teggs
    replied
    I think the full name provides valuable information, and the patch should be refused. Ideally, no one should have to obtain knowledge about every piece of software's history to be aware when known bad actors have been contributing to its code, let alone authored it to begin with.

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  • kylew77
    replied
    I've worked at a few shops that specifically disable SELinux to my shock because it is so difficult to work with <facepam>. If only it was easy to implement something like OpenBSD pledge and unveil kernel and userland wide in Linux...

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  • sarmad
    replied
    It's a bad technology anyway. They may as well just drop it altogether rather than only dropping the NSA reference. It's bad because it's over complicated, and when something is over complicated it leaves room for mistakes that result in security holes. I remember needing to turn it off whenever I needed to test my web server back in the days when I was using Fedora before getting fed up with SELinux and jumping distros.

    Leave a comment:


  • You-
    replied
    Originally posted by rclark View Post
    Strange world we live in now though as history is being rewritten, and in some cases erased.
    None of that is happening here. The copyrights and acknowledgements remain, but calling it "NSA Selinux" as if it is a specific branded product is being changed.

    When Oracle bought Sun, they didnt keep the names of products like Open Office or Java as Sun Microsystems' Open Office, Java etc.

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  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    But hey, as others have said in threads here you shouldn't worry unless you have something to hide, right?

    Never mind that many laws are written in such a way that you're wrong no matter what do you, if the authority decides they want to prosecute/persecute you.

    Leave a comment:

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