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Linux 6.1 Should Be Very Exciting With Rust, AMD PMF, MGLRU & Other Changes Expected

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  • Linux 6.1 Should Be Very Exciting With Rust, AMD PMF, MGLRU & Other Changes Expected

    Phoronix: Linux 6.1 Should Be Very Exciting With Rust, AMD PMF, MGLRU & Other Changes Expected

    Linux 6.0 is bringing many great features but looking ahead for Linux 6.1 there are even more changes to get excited about for that kernel which will release as stable around the end of 2022...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Linux-...res-Early-Look

  • #2
    I hope the MGLRU will be merged!
    It would be very nice to have at least this performance improvement feature after all the security mitigations on all these past years.

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    • #3
      It's almost like this should have carried a new major number, instead of 6.0. Oh well, it's just numbers. I wonder when they'll adopt the YYYY.MM scheme for versioning the kernel.

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      • #4
        Hopefully, 6.0 will become LTS, I don't want to have anything to do with Rust on my systems, especially on prod.
        Last edited by Sin2x; 03 October 2022, 07:10 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sin2x View Post
          Hopefully, 6.0 will become LTS, I don't want to have anything to do with Rust on my systems, especially on prod.
          You do know that, for the time being, Rust is only for drivers development? You don't want it, you don't install the driver.
          Though, judging by your reaction, you're just being a jerk.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bug77 View Post

            You do know that, for the time being, Rust is only for drivers development? You don't want it, you don't install the driver.
            Though, judging by your reaction, you're just being a jerk.
            Y'all simmer down now...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bug77 View Post
              It's almost like this should have carried a new major number, instead of 6.0. Oh well, it's just numbers. I wonder when they'll adopt the YYYY.MM scheme for versioning the kernel.
              in the current versioning scheme, 6.0 and 6.1 are both major numbers. 5.19->6.0 is exactly the same kind of change as 5.18->5.19 and 6.0->6.1. switching to a YYYY.MM scheme would only change two things that matter at all:
              1. we wouldn't know the version number of the next kernel release until it's actually released, unlike the current situation where we know the next version number as soon as rc1 is released.
              2. it would be easier to tell how old a major version of the kernel is from its version number, but not how recent the minor version is. unless they switched to a YYYY.MM.YYYYMMDD scheme for minor releases... but 2022.07.20220928 is a bit harder to read than 5.19.12, and would still require some extension in case more than one minor release happens in a single day.

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              • #8
                Is it just me, or have the last few releses of the kernel had an exceptional amount of really important and exciting changes for the future in them?

                I'm looking forward to seeing Linux gain more and more momentum.

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