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MGLRU Patches Merged To "mm-stable" Ahead Of Linux 6.1 - New Benchmarks Look Good

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  • MGLRU Patches Merged To "mm-stable" Ahead Of Linux 6.1 - New Benchmarks Look Good

    Phoronix: MGLRU Patches Merged To "mm-stable" Ahead Of Linux 6.1 - New Benchmarks Look Good

    As further indication of MGLRU hopefully being mainlined for Linux 6.1 as planned, the Multi-Gen LRU patches have now been moved to Andrew Morton's mm-stable branch...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/MGLRU-Reaches-mm-stable

  • #2
    Not to shabby. Fingers crossed for 6.1.

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    • #3
      It yields a significant benefit. I hope it is going to be implemented in the next kernel revision.

      Likely, it's more useful for servers than workstations.
      Last edited by MorrisS.; 27 September 2022, 09:29 AM.

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      • #4
        We have been implementing for a long time

        ‚Äčhttps://owncloud.netext73.com/s/44eG9m66PCz16YS

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MorrisS. View Post
          It yields a significant benefit. I hope it is going to be implemented in the next kernel revision.

          Likely, it's more useful for servers than workstations.
          It's running on chromebooks already, just FYI about usability for clients =)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MorrisS. View Post
            It yields a significant benefit. I hope it is going to be implemented in the next kernel revision.

            Likely, it's more useful for servers than workstations.
            I think it can benefit workstations in low-RAM situations. But with my 32GB, I won't be in a position to test this anytime soon :P

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MorrisS. View Post
              It yields a significant benefit. I hope it is going to be implemented in the next kernel revision.

              Likely, it's more useful for servers than workstations.
              It's been said to be useful for low memory devices as well. I expect it to be useful for my old netbook with 2GiB and my Raspberry

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bug77 View Post

                I think it can benefit workstations in low-RAM situations. But with my 32GB, I won't be in a position to test this anytime soon :P
                Just use teams + chrome + phpstorm and these 32 GB will be used in no time

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dispat0r View Post

                  Just use teams + chrome + phpstorm and these 32 GB will be used in no time
                  I hate teams with a passion, I use Chromium (as a secondary browser) and I don't do PHP, but I do use Idea for Java/Rust/Go.

                  I did have some problems with Chromium: cycling through tabs would balloon RAM usage until it ran out. But I haven't seen that in a while.

                  Joking aside, I'm pretty sure coming up with artificial scenarios to inflate RAM usage kind of defeats the purpose of MGLRU.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                    I hate teams with a passion
                    But you don't get to choose. Nobody uses it by choice, but by imposition by their employers.

                    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                    I use Chromium (as a secondary browser)
                    For what matters here they are both the same thing. The spyware telemetry is not the main source of bloat there.

                    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
                    Joking aside, I'm pretty sure coming up with artificial scenarios to inflate RAM usage kind of defeats the purpose of MGLRU.
                    While nobody says it's your particular case (and being fair, you were talking about your own workstation and nobody else's), take into account there's not much artificiality in the example, except maybe for the php stuff. A lot of people, possibly a majority, deal with those programs due to their employers' policies.

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