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Experimental Patch Gets The ARM64 Linux Kernel Compiling Under macOS

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  • Experimental Patch Gets The ARM64 Linux Kernel Compiling Under macOS

    Phoronix: Experimental Patch Gets The ARM64 Linux Kernel Compiling Under macOS

    Nick Desaulniers with Google who has been known for his contributions around compiling the Linux kernel with LLVM/Clang has recently taken to the challenge of being able to compile the Linux kernel under macOS...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Linux-Compile-On-macOS

  • #2
    Typos?

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    Nick published a work-in-progress patch with the necessary changes needed to perform the successful build. The patch is still to be cleaned up and splitten up before its potential upstreaming in the future.

    Nick annoucned the success overnight on the mailing list to gauge the interest level of other upstream developers and the Asahi Linux crew over the interest level in being able to compile the Linux kernel under macOS.​
    (not sure whether "splitten" is correct)


    So Apple still uses that "hello" wordmark... I wonder how did the helloSystem developer get away with using it.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
      Typos?



      (not sure whether "splitten" is correct)


      So Apple still uses that "hello" wordmark... I wonder how did the helloSystem developer get away with using it.
      I don't want to sound snarky, but I don't think many people care about helloSystem honestly speaking...

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      • #4
        I have some uses for this. Sometimes I compile custom kernels for small single board computers, mostly for testing and prototyping.

        I usually do it inside docker containers. Using docker has definitely some advantages, since you have fine grained control over the build environment, and you can always throw it away after you are done.

        But also having the option to do it directly in MacOS is still quite cool, assuming I don’t need to fiddle too much with the environment.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
          Typos?

          (not sure whether "splitten" is correct)
          Not for English. It's just "split". "Splitten" is one of those words like "irregardless".

          That reminds me, if you want to have some fun, use the phrase "irregarding that" around people. You'll be surprised how often you'll get corrected about how "irregardless" isn't a word. Shows how much you were really paying attention and keep up with the times. While not considered a real or official word, "irregarding" is technically a grammatically correct word and is more correct than the recently accepted "irregardless".

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          • #6
            While we are on errors, it's baling wire, for making hay-bales, not bailing wire [sic], which would presumably be used to remove water from floating vessels.

            [And if I'm really pedantic, it should probably be duck tape (tape originally made with cotton duck fabric), not duct tape (special-purpose tape for sealing air conditioning ducts, which doesn't contain cotton duck fabric, and uses a particular adhesive), but that battle is probably lost]
            Last edited by Old Grouch; 26 September 2022, 09:31 AM. Reason: Add pedantic duck

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            • #7
              Now that we are among pedants, let me say that I will never understand why Americans say "aluminum" instead of the correct "aluminium", but have no problem with "titanium".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                Now that we are among pedants, let me say that I will never understand why Americans say "aluminum" instead of the correct "aluminium", but have no problem with "titanium".
                Aluminum was originally coined that by British scientists back in the early 1800's. Other British scientists then renamed it Aluminium because they thought it sounded better, but both terms were used interchangeably for many years, in both America and Britain.

                In 1892, the Aluminum version was promoted in american advertisements for a new cheap way of obtaining the metal, and that ended up taking over as the standard way of pronunciation in the US. Previously the word had been pretty rarely used by the general public, and more so by scientists.

                As for why Britain eventually decided Aluminium was the "correct" way of saying it, I'm not sure.
                Last edited by smitty3268; 26 September 2022, 05:42 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post
                  As for why Britain eventually decided Aluminium was the "correct" way of saying it, I'm not sure.
                  Because they knew they couldn't retroactively create "lanthanium", "platinium", goldium", "tinium", "oxygenium", "hydrogenium", etc. for their little obsession with ending all elements with -ium, so they took what they could get away with. (They were probably the same people who tried to force "don't split the infinitive" on a language with Germanic rather than Latin grammar because they had such a hard-on for Latin being the perfect language.")

                  Aluminum was originally extracted from alumina, not some fictional "aluminia", just like how lanthanum was extracted from the oxide lanthana, not bought from some country named "lanthania". "Lanthanum, essence of lanthana. Aluminum, essence of alumina."

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                  • #10
                    Etymology of aluminium and aluminum.

                    The first name proposed for the metal to be isolated from alum was alumium, which Davy suggested in an 1808 article on his electrochemical research, published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.​

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