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Linux RSEQ Patches Updated For Allowing Faster getcpu() In C Libraries

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  • Linux RSEQ Patches Updated For Allowing Faster getcpu() In C Libraries

    Phoronix: Linux RSEQ Patches Updated For Allowing Faster getcpu() In C Libraries

    Restartable Sequences "RSEQ" has been one of the nice additions to the Linux kernel in recent years and can allow for faster user-space operations on per-CPU data by providing a shared data structure ABI between each user-space thread and the kernel. RSEQ has been in the process of being extended to provide even more performance benefits...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Linux-RSEQ-Faster-getcpu

  • #2
    As much as I don't like the corporate monstrosity Linux has grown into and much prefered the days around the turn of the century when it was just a small group of hackers hacking on code together-- much like OpenBSD is today-- it is hard to argue with the commanding performance advantages of Linux compared to any of the three or four big *BSD Operating Systems. That is not to say that FreeBSD and OpenBSD and NetBSD and DragonFlyBSD don't have their perks and reasons to like them but in most benchmarks they just get assaulted by Linux. Still I'm glad I made OpenBSD my laptop OS of choice on my new ThinkPad as soon as I swap out the wifi module because it is incompatible...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
      As much as I don't like the corporate monstrosity Linux has grown into and much prefered the days around the turn of the century when it was just a small group of hackers hacking on code together-- much like OpenBSD is today-- it is hard to argue with the commanding performance advantages of Linux compared to any of the three or four big *BSD Operating Systems. That is not to say that FreeBSD and OpenBSD and NetBSD and DragonFlyBSD don't have their perks and reasons to like them but in most benchmarks they just get assaulted by Linux. Still I'm glad I made OpenBSD my laptop OS of choice on my new ThinkPad as soon as I swap out the wifi module because it is incompatible...
      You could just say you don't like the fact Linux is not a toy anymore.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Volta View Post

        You could just say you don't like the fact Linux is not a toy anymore.
        Fair enough. Linux used to be more of a toy back in the day and now the cloud providers plus Red Hat have commercialized it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by kylew77 View Post

          Fair enough. Linux used to be more of a toy back in the day and now the cloud providers plus Red Hat have commercialized it.
          It probably was in HPC long before the cloud. Some of the less commercialized OSes aren't toys either. Toys are minix, haiku, hurd.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
            As much as I don't like the corporate monstrosity Linux has grown into and much prefered the days around the turn of the century when it was just a small group of hackers hacking on code together-- much like OpenBSD is today-- it is hard to argue with the commanding performance advantages of Linux compared to any of the three or four big *BSD Operating Systems. That is not to say that FreeBSD and OpenBSD and NetBSD and DragonFlyBSD don't have their perks and reasons to like them but in most benchmarks they just get assaulted by Linux. Still I'm glad I made OpenBSD my laptop OS of choice on my new ThinkPad as soon as I swap out the wifi module because it is incompatible...
            Cant bsd just take a peek at linux.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Volta View Post

              It probably was in HPC long before the cloud. Some of the less commercialized OSes aren't toys either. Toys are minix, haiku, hurd.
              Is a Supercomputer much more than a high speed private cloud though? Instead of the nodes being linked with 10GbE or higher they are linked with infinity band instead. Which is higher speed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by cj.wijtmans View Post

                Cant bsd just take a peek at linux.
                Yes and no. Any dual licensed code licensed MIT, Apache, or BSD licensed gets ported over like graphics and wifi drivers. Anything GPL based would taint their user land and or kernels. Now there is a special case that I don't understand, how FreeBSD pulled in the copy left ZFS file system without tainting the whole kernel. I think it had to do with Solaris shims or something or another but I've never heard how they kept the BSD license while pulling in something that was copy left, just a different copy left than the GPL.

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