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DreamWorks Animation To Open-Source MoonRay Renderer

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  • mroche
    replied
    Originally posted by Aaron View Post

    Haha. What are these civil and well-informed comments that you keep posting and what are they doing here?

    Seriously, thank you for your input. I learnt as much from your two comments as the original article.
    Happy to have shared some knowledge! Though I'm no longer in the animation industry, I do very much like discussing it

    Cheers,
    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • guara
    replied
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

    Care to share what that licensed IP is?
    It's quite possible that they are related to texture compression algorithms. It shouldn't be a problem on many countries, but on US multiple algorithms have been patented.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aaron
    replied
    Originally posted by mroche View Post

    This is only partially true.
    Haha. What are these civil and well-informed comments that you keep posting and what are they doing here?

    Seriously, thank you for your input. I learnt as much from your two comments as the original article.

    Leave a comment:


  • ClosedSource
    replied
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post
    Care to share what that licensed IP is?
    It's a well known historical occurrence that NVIDIA bought 3dfx interactive along with licencing to use technologies that were in turn licensed from other IP holders.
    NVIDIA was forced against its will for two decades not to release open source drivers and they complained that multiple opengl implementations was trouble (mesa and theirs). Since hardly any Linux installations are desktops, maintaining the Xorg driver was overhead.
    As time passed, they were able to rewrite the parts they did not own in the kernel driver. The actual libraries are more troublesome because replacing architecture is not something users will immediately agree to.
    Last edited by ClosedSource; 08 August 2022, 02:18 AM.

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  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

    So you were infact just talking out of your a$$?

    Noted...
    So you can't even argue in good faith convincingly enough to omit the early 2000s Micro$oft typing conventions?

    Noted...

    Leave a comment:


  • mroche
    replied
    Originally posted by CommunityMember View Post

    The studio's have finally admitted the obvious, that the value (of their production) is not the software and tooling itself, but the creative processes (the story, the characters), and there is no advantage in keeping the tooling locked up behind some proprietary wall.
    This is only partially true. For studios that produce work entirely in-house (such as animation studios like Pixar, DreamWorks, Walt Disney Animation), this is true in many cases and usually for tools that can be considered general commodities (render engines, image viewers, etc). They don't compete with each other except on the films they produce. For contracting studios in VFX, advertising, etc this is less true because their proprietary technologies allow them to create competitive edges in areas (particularly with new or groundbreaking techniques) that can help in winning contract bids and engagements over other studios. And depending on the field the end deliverable isn't always just a series of images.

    The majority of the time where open-sourcing doesn't make sense is because the tool is so specific to the way a studio works or wouldn't be generally useful to others. Pixar and DreamWorks have their own DCC packages (Presto and Premo respectively) rather than use off-the-shelf tools like Maya for parts of the production pipeline. No-one else would be able to use these tools without massively re-architecting the program to be pipeline agnostic. Every studio has a suite of tools developed in house that no-one outside the studio will ever use anywhere else, you will rarely find a place that is using strictly off-the-shelf DCC packages and plugins.

    Originally posted by matsukan View Post
    Is this Windows or Azure or other vendor lock only software ? There is no any mentioned platforms for which this application targeted to work.
    DreamWorks is a CentOS based studio, their tools are Linux native. The mentions of Azure have to do with how the distributed compute aspect of MoonRay (Arras) works, and they are leveraging the cloud to provide those resources. Though I haven't seen the code, I'm willing to bet Arras is already relatively platform agnostic or wouldn't be too challenging to make so.

    Check out some of the links in this Hacker News comment for some extra resources on MoonRay: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=32358843

    Cheers,
    Mike
    Last edited by mroche; 07 August 2022, 03:17 PM.

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  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
    nvidiots are funny
    Satanists even more so...

    Leave a comment:


  • Linuxxx
    replied
    Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

    No clue. They haven't said, but I remember that being part of why AMD had to rewrite their drivers when they went from fglrx to the open-sourced ones, so it wouldn't surprise me if nVidia were the same.
    So you were infact just talking out of your a$$?

    Noted...

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post
    nVidia's state-of-the-art proprietary driver components...
    nvidiots are funny

    Leave a comment:


  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by Linuxxx View Post

    Care to share what that licensed IP is?
    No clue. They haven't said, but I remember that being part of why AMD had to rewrite their drivers when they went from fglrx to the open-sourced ones, so it wouldn't surprise me if nVidia were the same.

    Leave a comment:

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