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Linux 5.19 Released - Linus Torvalds Released It From An Apple Silicon MacBook

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  • Linux 5.19 Released - Linus Torvalds Released It From An Apple Silicon MacBook

    Phoronix: Linux 5.19 Released - Linus Torvalds Released It From An Apple Silicon MacBook

    Linus Torvalds just released Linux 5.19 as stable for the newest version of the Linux kernel. He also mentioned this is the first time he released the new Linux kernel from an ARM64 laptop in the form of an Apple MacBook running an AArch64 Apple M1 SoC...

    https://www.phoronix.com/news/Linux-5.19-Released

  • #2
    Yeah. like I mentioned in the 30+ device lenovo thread, Apple only makes 2 or 3 models and the hardware are all great.
    Others make 30+ models and they are all crap compared to the Apple.

    I should maybe try and get Asahi running om my macbook-pro since I am not really a MacOS fan.

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    • #3
      Human readable changelog https://kernelnewbies.org/Linux_5.19 (not yet ready, will be done in the next 48 hours).

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      • #4
        > ...Linus Torvalds ... released the new Linux kernel from an ... Apple M1 SoC...

        I have increased optamisum for next year

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        • #5
          Apple doesn't use UEFI for the M1 and M2 Macs. Does that mean that the kernel has to have Apple-specific dtbs for the hardware?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
            Apple doesn't use UEFI for the M1 and M2 Macs. Does that mean that the kernel has to have Apple-specific dtbs for the hardware?
            That's always been the case for consumer-grade ARM-equipped hardware, isn't it?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rmnscnce View Post

              That's always been the case for consumer-grade ARM-equipped hardware, isn't it?
              Not in Windows. Microsoft has since Windows 10 mandated the use of UEFI in Windows devices running on ARM so that a single generic ARM image can be loaded across all ARM Windows devices.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

                Not in Windows. Microsoft has since Windows 10 mandated the use of UEFI in Windows devices running on ARM so that a single generic ARM image can be loaded across all ARM Windows devices.
                There's very few Windows ARM devices compared to the number of ARM devices in general and even fewer Windows 10 compliant ARM devices. You're both correct, but the vast majority of ARM devices have a variety of standards and non-standard (proprietary/locked) methods of loading the OS. Windows is practically irrelevant to ARM right now.

                This is one thing that the PC world has going for it: the amount of standards that govern the way it boots, talks to peripherals, etc are generally complied with by all the OEMs. That's not the case in the ARM world. Hopefully the RISC-V world will lean more towards and improve upon PC than ARM in this way (and hopefully ARM doesn't end up so dominant for the sake of security and privacy).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by elatllat View Post
                  > ...Linus Torvalds ... released the new Linux kernel from an ... Apple M1 SoC...

                  I have increased optamisum for next year
                  Same, although moreso because there are other ARM laptops out there and more in the works than just Apple's than anything else. I've heard that nvidia might be working on an ARM chip with an integrated nvidia GPU (albeit i think that news was from 2019 or something); and i know Lenovo actually released an ARM laptop that's actually good (it's not as good as the M1, it's completely unviable for gaming, and I haven't heard anything about it working on linux, but it's there, lenovo x13s; it's also unfortunately massively overpriced though, but cpu performance wise, it's not far behind the M1 at all. It's on par with a Intel Core i7-8700; faster even for single threaded applications, but it's igpu is complete garbage.)

                  The transition from CISC to RISC architectures on the PC is well underway,

                  Edit: Wow, there was an article about kernel 5.20 supporting lenovo x13s yesterday,, i had just missed it
                  Last edited by rabcor; 31 July 2022, 11:25 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

                    There's very few Windows ARM devices compared to the number of ARM devices in general and even fewer Windows 10 compliant ARM devices. You're both correct, but the vast majority of ARM devices have a variety of standards and non-standard (proprietary/locked) methods of loading the OS. Windows is practically irrelevant to ARM right now.

                    This is one thing that the PC world has going for it: the amount of standards that govern the way it boots, talks to peripherals, etc are generally complied with by all the OEMs. That's not the case in the ARM world. Hopefully the RISC-V world will lean more towards and improve upon PC than ARM in this way (and hopefully ARM doesn't end up so dominant for the sake of security and privacy).
                    And that is why people are going to have to pry x64 and the PC platform out of my cold, dead hands.

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