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Linux 5.19 Frowns On x86/x86_64 Late Microcode Loading - "It's Just Lottery & Broken"

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  • Hafting
    replied
    Originally posted by bug77 View Post
    I can't imagine why you'd want to load the proper microcode after your CPU starts doing stuff...
    Well, load microcode to make the cpu work better? Surely, the cpu is not so broken that it cannot boot without microcode - because then it couldn't even boot up and get to the microcode loading.

    If I get new improved microcode, why should I need to boot the thing? Just load the code. Perhaps the cpu needs to go single-core for a while - but just do that then?

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  • NobodyXu
    replied
    Originally posted by gigaplex View Post

    I think it's
    Code:
    make headers_install
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • gigaplex
    replied
    Originally posted by NobodyXu View Post

    How do I only generate and install the headers? Is there a special target in the linux Makefile just for this?
    I think it's
    Code:
    make headers_install

    Leave a comment:


  • NobodyXu
    replied
    Originally posted by gigaplex View Post

    If the initramfs just needs the headers, you don't need to do a full compile the first time.
    How do I only generate and install the headers? Is there a special target in the linux Makefile just for this?

    Leave a comment:


  • gigaplex
    replied
    Originally posted by NobodyXu View Post

    Yeah, but on the first run, you would have to build the kernel twice, so it indeed makes thing a bit harder.
    If the initramfs just needs the headers, you don't need to do a full compile the first time.

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  • NobodyXu
    replied
    Originally posted by sinepgib View Post

    Shouln't the "don't break userspace" rule be enough as long as you keep the same .config?
    Then it's not as much compiling as it is buildintg the image AFAICT.
    Yeah, but on the first run, you would have to build the kernel twice, so it indeed makes thing a bit harder.

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  • carewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by sinepgib View Post

    I'm not sure if you mean having a single file or having a generic build that works everywhere, but in the first case I think you can bundle the initrd in your regular kernel, and for UEFI you can make a PE that includes both the kernel and initrd, there's a guide in Lennart's blog (he promotes it for systemd-boot, but should work regardless).
    I meant a single image file. It is easier to test things that way, but also forces you to make sure you have all the right modules integrated into the image. If you want something that works everywhere initrd is much easier.

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  • sinepgib
    replied
    Originally posted by NobodyXu View Post

    If you build your own kernel, then you can put the initramfs directly into the kernel in `make menuconfig`.

    The real challenge here lies on how you compile libc for your initramfs, as it depends on kernel headers generated by the compilation of the kernel.
    So you would have to compile your kernel first, then build your initramfs, then compile your kernel again with the updated initramfs.
    Shouln't the "don't break userspace" rule be enough as long as you keep the same .config?
    Then it's not as much compiling as it is buildintg the image AFAICT.

    Leave a comment:


  • NobodyXu
    replied
    Originally posted by sinepgib View Post

    I'm not sure if you mean having a single file or having a generic build that works everywhere, but in the first case I think you can bundle the initrd in your regular kernel, and for UEFI you can make a PE that includes both the kernel and initrd, there's a guide in Lennart's blog (he promotes it for systemd-boot, but should work regardless).
    If you build your own kernel, then you can put the initramfs directly into the kernel in `make menuconfig`.

    The real challenge here lies on how you compile libc for your initramfs, as it depends on kernel headers generated by the compilation of the kernel.
    So you would have to compile your kernel first, then build your initramfs, then compile your kernel again with the updated initramfs.

    Leave a comment:


  • sinepgib
    replied
    Originally posted by carewolf View Post
    Single kernel image.. I used to do that decades ago when playing around with Linux, but honestly it was just laziness.
    I'm not sure if you mean having a single file or having a generic build that works everywhere, but in the first case I think you can bundle the initrd in your regular kernel, and for UEFI you can make a PE that includes both the kernel and initrd, there's a guide in Lennart's blog (he promotes it for systemd-boot, but should work regardless).

    Leave a comment:

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