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Systemd 251 Released With systemd-sysupdate Introduced, Many Other Additions

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  • birdie
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    You have no sense of humor whatsoever. That's the only problem here.
    That wasn't a joke, tilde, that's the issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by STiAT View Post
    I probably missed it, but what's actually the "mission statement" for systemd-sysupdate? Some system layer for package management to use to do system update to unify the update procedures all the packaging tools do?

    The documentation didn't give me any sound clues - anything out there explaining what they are aiming for with this?
    It handles A/B partition style system upgrades. Probably mainly useful in embedded & similar applications.

    Leave a comment:


  • STiAT
    replied
    I probably missed it, but what's actually the "mission statement" for systemd-sysupdate? Some system layer for package management to use to do system update to unify the update procedures all the packaging tools do?

    The documentation didn't give me any sound clues - anything out there explaining what they are aiming for with this?

    Leave a comment:


  • _ReD_
    replied
    Woof! Woof! Who let the dos out???

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post

    Thank you for making sure I will never see your posts again. It's pure comedy gold only you're serious and sorry, my brain can't handle this. There's enough propaganda, idiocy, lies and exaggerations in the world to read even more than this in the comments section of the bloody technical website meant for the most intelligent people.
    You have no sense of humor whatsoever. That's the only problem here.
    Last edited by tildearrow; 21 May 2022, 07:09 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by user1 View Post
    Microsoft secretly wants Linux to become more bloated, so that it will stop having the edge over Windows in performance benchmarks and people will stop switching to Linux for performance reasons
    The parallel execution model of systemd helps a lot there. Distributing services between cores, now that multi-core has become common, is a great recipe for slowing down boot.

    Leave a comment:


  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by waxhead View Post
    It's it a bad thing? Maybe not. The Linux development model have proven that no company can fully control everything... Systemd is another question as this is soon a operatingsystem within a operativsystem and thanks to the licensing it can be a nice "vector" for lock-in stuff. If this is the route Microsoft wants to take is another question, but they for sure want to contribute if that helps their goal to minimize cost and secure future profits one way or another.
    Systemd is not "an operating system within an operating system". What does that even mean? Systemd is part (or more precisely a collection of parts) of an operating system. It's not an "OS within an OS" any more that the BSD userland is. As to the licencing being a vector for lock-in, seriously? It's LGPL. Let me say this again because it apparently still evades lots of people: It's LGPL. So unless the (L)GPL is now a lock-in licence, it has exactly the same lock-in effect as the Linux kernel itself, or glibc or GCC. That is to say, none whatsoever.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadeUpName
    replied
    Code:
    systemctl disable systemd-sysupdate

    Leave a comment:


  • er888kh
    replied
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    Just a sidenote: Stuxnet, Petya, WannaCry all used bespoke exploits for Windows developed by the smartest hackers of the world. Linux has a large number of exploits only no one uses its on the desktop so there's nothing to discuss.

    It's plain idiocy. I deal with facts, not conspiracies.
    Let's deal with facts. What about finding an instance of some Linux malware causing economic losses of more than $1 billion? (WannaCry did 4 according to wikipedia). How about some malware destroying nuclear grade hardware? Nothing? Stuxnet destroyed centrifuges.

    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    now according to you Microsoft specifially leaves security holes in it to be exploited
    No, I didn't say such a thing. I even went as far as saying they probably have no interest in collecting data from high level organizations and targets. I merely implied that it is easier and more cost effective to develop expoits for Windows than other platforms. I didn't try to reason about why Windows might be inherently less secure.

    Now, I see there are quite a few vulnerabilities around the kernel. They mean pretty much nothing. Someone exploiting a floppy driver in the kernel can get a CVE for it. Some companies (like RedHat) even get out of their way to get CVEs for everything. Look at the total value of all the hardware that is running Linux and the value of the data that is on that hardware, and the total amount of economic losses caused by OS/kernel bugs.

    And you mention Android. The security of a consumer device made 5 years ago by a chinese manufacturer (or even a company with a good apetite for user data such as google) and never got a security update should not be compared to computers in charge of patient data in hospitals, bussiness critical data in small companies and devices in charge of enriching Uranium. This comparison is simply laughable.

    Leave a comment:


  • jacob
    replied
    Originally posted by timofonic View Post
    Microsoft engineers working on systemd. This seems like a perfect plot for a conspiracy theory story.
    The last thing we need is more systemd conspiracy theories.
    Last edited by jacob; 21 May 2022, 05:10 PM.

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