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OpenPrinting Releases CUPS 2.4 With AirPrint, OAuth 2.0 Support

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  • OpenPrinting Releases CUPS 2.4 With AirPrint, OAuth 2.0 Support

    Phoronix: OpenPrinting Releases CUPS 2.4 With AirPrint, OAuth 2.0 Support

    Earlier this year OpenPrinting took over development of the CUPS print server with Apple no longer interested in handling the future development of this open-source Linux/macOS/Unix/Solaris print server. Out this week is CUPS 2.4 as the first major release under the guidance of OpenPrinting...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...nting-CUPS-2.4

  • #2
    And here I thought PAPPL would be the next thing...

    Comment


    • #3
      Wasn't CUPS basically just a complete disaster to the point where you're better off just passthroughing your printer to a VM?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by rabcor View Post
        Wasn't CUPS basically just a complete disaster to the point where you're better off just passthroughing your printer to a VM?
        There is a catch. More printers are supported by CUPS under Linux than using current Windows or Mac OS.

        People set up raspberry pis running Linux so that they can make their old network connected printers work with Windows 10. Yes this stupid what the setup is CUPS on the raspberry pi and have windows 10 print to cups and its cups on the raspberry pi that talks the old printer network protocols you cannot make work with current version windows any more.

        VM with printers only help so far. Yes windows with Linux in a VM passing a printer though can result in timing out. VM with printers is not a magic solve all bullet either.

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        • #5
          Does this mean we will have direct support for AirPrint and Mopria in our linux distros when we get the update? That'd be nice to have built-in without having to download anything else.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by oiaohm View Post

            There is a catch. More printers are supported by CUPS under Linux than using current Windows or Mac OS.

            People set up raspberry pis running Linux so that they can make their old network connected printers work with Windows 10. Yes this stupid what the setup is CUPS on the raspberry pi and have windows 10 print to cups and its cups on the raspberry pi that talks the old printer network protocols you cannot make work with current version windows any more.

            VM with printers only help so far. Yes windows with Linux in a VM passing a printer though can result in timing out. VM with printers is not a magic solve all bullet either.
            This is nice.

            Also, I don't believe you can fuck up that much a printing protocol. It being not as good as a clean-slate design doesn't mean that much.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jorgepl View Post
              Also, I don't believe you can fuck up that much a printing protocol. It being not as good as a clean-slate design doesn't mean that much.
              It really does depend on the printing protocol. Lot of modern day printers that are called driverless are using IPP Everywhere based protocols.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intern...nting_Protocol What is the protocol that cups is based on IPP. The two network protocols for printers that are on the path to being the only network protocols for printing is IPP Everywhere and Airprint. Yes Airprint another different extend to IPP.

              I will generically cover busted to hell printing protocols.

              https://riptutorial.com/postscript
              You know group old network printing protocols based around postscript. Scary point postscript is Turing-complete general programming language, So you can send a postscript document to a postscript printer infinity sized document. So prints you power off the printer.

              That someone being evil right. Not exactly. Then you notice a lot of the Then some of these old network printing protocols based around postscript decide that UDP would be better than TCP this end up running the protocol without check sums and if you network does not transfer packets 100 percent correctly all the time you roll the dice until you are having a printer to into print everything it has mode due to turing complete postscript being formed orders the printer to-do this.

              This is one forms of printer protocol screw up.
              Lot of history printing protocols have the turing complete problem. Yes starts with how can we compress the living heck out of the print job darn a turing complete language works well for the job we will just use that. Path to hell to those using the printer in future as printer goes nuts and prints until it out of paper or ink and if you refill the printer it will just keep on going printing garbage.

              Lot of history printing protocols lack proper checksum so network or cable damage to packets causing printers to do insanely wacky things is very possible.

              The most insane printing protocols are the printers where the vendor decide to make the printer as dumb as possible so the computer is in fact sending the commands to drive the printer head backwards and forwards. Even worse having the end stops on the carriage have to send message to computer to tell printer to stop driving the -printer head into the wall of the printer. Yes printers using protocols this bad are normally not supported by cups and if you attempt to vm a old copy of windows to use the old driver the jitter vm has causes this class of printer to-do really bad things.

              One worse outcomes of this is jack hammering the carriage into the side of the printer causing the printer to walk along the desk and on to the floor so tipping the ink over the very hot drive motor due to the jack hammering and due to using alcohol based ink the ink catches fire that then lights up the paper in the printer that proceeds to light up the carpet that proceeds to burn down the building. Yes was all the result of someone attempting to use a vm to operate old printer that had a horrible direct direct drive printer protocol that end up being written up as the cause in a fire investigation. Lot of cases if you are needing to use a VM to use a printer you straight up need to do some homework if this is a safe option. Some printer price of dumping the printer and buying a new one is well and truly worth it.

              So there is a long list of badly broken printing protocols. Of course the vendors who made printers that have really screwed up protocol don't want to release new drivers and just mark them as deprecated. If open source drivers were made for those protocols cups and it printer drivers have kept on supporting them. No one made open source drivers for the most problem child printers.

              This is the way I work if cups/open source printer drivers does not support the old printer you want to use you really need to ask is it worth it at this point. If you say yes it worth it you need to make sure its not a jackhammering or other form of hazard printer.

              Most cases today if buying a new printer you can just buy one of the new driverless printers that either use IPP everywhere or airprint and be sure of a safe device. Ok a device that might rip you budget to hell with printer cartridge policies but other than that safe. IPP everywhere and airprint printers have to have a decent sized CPU inside them to run the mechanical side themselves and have mandated check-sums.

              Of course the driverless printers are basically supported by all operating systems close to equally. So 2D printers needing drivers are very quickly coming legacy printers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by oiaohm View Post


                The most insane printing protocols are the printers where the vendor decide to make the printer as dumb as possible so the computer is in fact sending the commands to drive the printer head backwards and forwards. Even worse having the end stops on the carriage have to send message to computer to tell printer to stop driving the -printer head into the wall of the printer. Yes printers using protocols this bad are normally not supported by cups and if you attempt to vm a old copy of windows to use the old driver the jitter vm has causes this class of printer to-do really bad things.

                One worse outcomes of this is jack hammering the carriage into the side of the printer causing the printer to walk along the desk and on to the floor so tipping the ink over the very hot drive motor due to the jack hammering and due to using alcohol based ink the ink catches fire that then lights up the paper in the printer that proceeds to light up the carpet that proceeds to burn down the building. Yes was all the result of someone attempting to use a vm to operate old printer that had a horrible direct direct drive printer protocol that end up being written up as the cause in a fire investigation. Lot of cases if you are needing to use a VM to use a printer you straight up need to do some homework if this is a safe option. Some printer price of dumping the printer and buying a new one is well and truly worth it.
                There's a status message for that: lp0 on fire

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
                  And here I thought PAPPL would be the next thing...
                  PAPPL doesn't replace CUPS - it's a framework for accelerating development of printer drivers. Except they're technically CUPS printer applications, which is the recommended device interface now. PAPPL is mostly applicable to vendors and developers who want to support their devices. It provides a lot of shared resources you can use, samples and instructions on how to hook up your weird protocols and formats. Users will just get the end result for installing their printers. I know all the press on it was super-confusing - especially since it was the new project by the old CUPS developer. I had to dig a bit to figure how it fits in to everything.

                  CUPS isn't going away for a while. Any device or installation that doesn't support network printing will be using it. Things like IPP, WSD, eSCL and the like make multifunction devices capable of driverless operation, which is great. Assuming you've enabled self-discovery or put the DNS records in yourself.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Frankly the status of 'driverless' printing is way ahead of 'driverless' video-conferencing. And scanning usually works.

                    I want to walk into a conference room and my laptop to seamlessly integrate the expensive screen, camera, microphones and speakers into whatever video-conference I set up. None of the proprietary nonsense of needing a particular manufacturer's software to drive their kit. Right now conferencing is a car-crash of incompatibilities and crazy UI models. Standardisation and commodification is needed.

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