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Bcachefs Merges Support For Btrfs-Like Snapshots

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  • Bcachefs Merges Support For Btrfs-Like Snapshots

    Phoronix: Bcachefs Merges Support For Btrfs-Like Snapshots

    It's been a while since having any news to report on Bcachefs as the promising open-source file-system born out of the Linux kernel's block cache code. However, Kent Overstreet continues working tirelessly on it and has now merged Bcachefs' snapshot support...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...ands-Snapshots

  • #2
    I just hope it gets merged soon....
    I really would like to use it in my NAS (yes i have backups)

    it looks like all i ever wanted from a filesystem (but well.. i thought the same about btrfs and zfs. i dont use them anymore)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by flower View Post
      I just hope it gets merged soon....
      I really would like to use it in my NAS (yes i have backups)

      it looks like all i ever wanted from a filesystem (but well.. i thought the same about btrfs and zfs. i dont use them anymore)
      People usually go "I used btrfs, got disappointed and now I'm happy with the enterpriZe-grade™ zfs" or the other way around, what made you disappointed in both of them?

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      • #4
        You forgot to mention that quota support needs to be remade from scratch and thus has been removed.
        ## VGA ##
        AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
        Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by intelfx View Post

          People usually go "I used btrfs, got disappointed and now I'm happy with the enterpriZe-grade™ zfs" or the other way around, what made you disappointed in both of them?
          zfs: license
          btrfs: raid5 is a joke
          ## VGA ##
          AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
          Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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          • #6
            I've started using btrfs on my brand new desktop. So far it seems to work fine, and the snapshots are a neat feature, makes consistent backups easier. Before I used LVM2 for that. Not using RAID at all there.

            I don't have a NAS. I recognize RAID will be more important there.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by darkbasic View Post

              zfs: license
              btrfs: raid5 is a joke
              RAID5 is a joke, period. Even without btrfs.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darkbasic View Post

                zfs: license
                btrfs: raid5 is a joke
                I truly don't get the ZFS license issue...the "it's the wrong kind of open source" issue. I get the kernel maintainer reason, but for the average user that seems like a weird place to draw a line in the sand (especially when they're NVIDIA GPU users...not saying you are, just in general).

                Looks like Bcachefs might become my root in another year. I'm wanting a replacement for BTRFS and it's currently a competition between Bcachefs and F2FS.

                So how many of y'all write [email protected] the first time instead of F2FS?

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                • #9
                  My home file server uses a combination of Bcache, LUKS, XFS and mergerfs, with SnapRAID for asynchronous redundancy/parity. A single SSD provides read and writeback block cache for 10 HDDs, and SnapRAID will snapshot parity for those 10 disks onto 2 parity disks every 6 hours. The upside of this setup over conventional (including ZFS) raid is that most HDDs will be spun down most of the time, meaning they are silent, use little power and generate little heat. Thanks to Bcache, they don't even spin up for ls or find most of the time, because the metadata blocks are on the SSD most of the time. Another upside is that I can mix HDD sizes and make full use of all of them, given that the parity disks are at least as large as the largest data disk. For read-mostly file systems that are mainly used for archival, it's a perfect compromise! I have a separate SSD-only filesystem for highly volatile data.

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                  • #10
                    Oh, I love btrfs: https://unix.stackexchange.com/quest...how-to-recover

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