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Samsung 860/870 SSDs Continue Causing Problems For Linux Users

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  • #11
    are these drives are really old @bash2bsash is bluffing

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    • #12
      Originally posted by obri View Post
      Hmm,

      I use an 850 Evo and an 860 Evo and I am not aware of any problems.
      How can I find out, if my drives/controller will bring issues to me?

      I use a B350 Motherboard, but MSI has no Info, what exact controller is in use.
      Yeah, pretty same thing to me. I use a 860 EVO as my Dell's laptop second drive (to /home) and didn't find any problem. But could be my daily usage is pretty boring. I would like to know if there is any checking I can do to see if I have the problem.

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      • #13
        What would be a linux friendly drive manufacturor ?

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        • #14
          From reddit:

          this is a problem with the MJX controller on the ssd and it also happens on intel chipset.

          https://unix.stackexchange.com/quest...e-fpdma-queued

          it is fixed in samsung MKX revision of said chip.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by gigi View Post
            are these drives are really old @bash2bsash is bluffing
            Is that so? Mine shows the same stats, only it's uptime is just 4 years 9 months and 3 days. My experience with a dozen or so SSD's of various brands and models have been very solid (pun intended). Can't say the same about HDD's, especially Seagate ones. Can't count the amount of Seagate drives that failed me, some only after a few months of use. I have/had other brands of HDD's that were fairly reliable though.

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            • #16
              I am not bluffing, I just copied the stats from the SMART tool.

              In addition, I'd like to point out, that these 850 PRO drives have been hammered constantly in desktops and some office servers. Tons of use round the clock 24/7 non-stop. Cron jobs, databases, virtual machines, development work, running MongoDB, MariaDB, CentOS and Fedora.

              What is also interesting, is the power cycle count, which is at 204. So on average this particular system has been rebooted about 28 times per year (mostly due to kernel updates, a PSU change and a memory upgrade).

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              • #17
                Heh, SSD drives fail me all the time. Of course I abuse the hell out of them with development work and hammering giant databases. My oldest living drives are like 2 or 3 years old and showing errors.

                SSD just can't keep up with the old spinning drives that just keep on going, and going. I have 5 WD 640GB Black drives with over 12 years power-on and zero errors.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by mhalano View Post

                  Yeah, pretty same thing to me. I use a 860 EVO as my Dell's laptop second drive (to /home) and didn't find any problem. But could be my daily usage is pretty boring. I would like to know if there is any checking I can do to see if I have the problem.
                  I decided to live dangerously this morning and ran it on my machine. 4x860 EVOs. Two of them (500GB) in a 1TB RAID 0. The other two: 1TB Linux Data drive and 500GB Windows drive

                  Code:
                  $ /sbin/fstrim -n -v
                  fstrim: no mountpoint specified
                  
                  $ /sbin/fstrim -a -n -v
                  /mnt/games: 0 B (dry run) trimmed on /dev/sdd1
                  /boot/efi: 0 B (dry run) trimmed on /dev/md126p1
                  /: 0 B (dry run) trimmed on /dev/md126p2
                  
                  $ /sbin/fstrim -a -v
                  fstrim: /mnt/games: FITRIM ioctl failed: Operation not permitted
                  fstrim: /boot/efi: FITRIM ioctl failed: Operation not permitted
                  fstrim: /: FITRIM ioctl failed: Operation not permitted
                  
                  $ sudo /sbin/fstrim -a -n -v
                  /mnt/games: 0 B (dry run) trimmed on /dev/sdd1
                  /boot/efi: 0 B (dry run) trimmed on /dev/md126p1
                  /: 0 B (dry run) trimmed on /dev/md126p2
                  
                  $ sudo /sbin/fstrim -a -v
                  /mnt/games: 96.3 GiB (103374827520 bytes) trimmed on /dev/sdd1
                  /boot/efi: 477.8 MiB (500965376 bytes) trimmed on /dev/md126p1
                  /: 105.2 GiB (112951443456 bytes) trimmed on /dev/md126p2
                  
                  $ sudo /sbin/fstrim -a -v
                  /mnt/games: 96.3 GiB (103374827520 bytes) trimmed on /dev/sdd1
                  /boot/efi: 477.8 MiB (500965376 bytes) trimmed on /dev/md126p1
                  /: 105.2 GiB (112966406144 bytes) trimmed on /dev/md126p2
                  Rebooted, and alive to tell the story. And I am not even kidding, the desktop is flying. I think it... did something, or some really good placebo. Not sure but one of the two.

                  I say do it. Won't be responsible for any damage but DMs are open if you need any help.

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                  • #19
                    Please note that NCQ will be disabled only for AMD/ATI chipsets (vendor ID 0x1002), not for AMD chipsets (vendor ID 0x1022).
                    Check with lspci -nn

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by boitano View Post
                      Please note that NCQ will be disabled only for AMD/ATI chipsets (vendor ID 0x1002), not for AMD chipsets (vendor ID 0x1022).
                      Check with lspci -nn
                      Code:
                      $ sudo lspci -nn
                      00:00.0 Host bridge [0600]: Intel Corporation 4th Gen Core Processor DRAM Controller [8086:0c00] (rev 06)
                      00:01.0 PCI bridge [0604]: Intel Corporation Xeon E3-1200 v3/4th Gen Core Processor PCI Express x16 Controller [8086:0c01] (rev 06)
                      00:14.0 USB controller [0c03]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family USB xHCI [8086:8c31] (rev 05)
                      00:16.0 Communication controller [0780]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family MEI Controller #1 [8086:8c3a] (rev 04)
                      00:1a.0 USB controller [0c03]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family USB EHCI #2 [8086:8c2d] (rev 05)
                      00:1b.0 Audio device [0403]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset High Definition Audio Controller [8086:8c20] (rev 05)
                      00:1c.0 PCI bridge [0604]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family PCI Express Root Port #1 [8086:8c10] (rev d5)
                      00:1c.4 PCI bridge [0604]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family PCI Express Root Port #5 [8086:8c18] (rev d5)
                      00:1c.5 PCI bridge [0604]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family PCI Express Root Port #6 [8086:8c1a] (rev d5)
                      00:1c.6 PCI bridge [0604]: Intel Corporation 82801 PCI Bridge [8086:244e] (rev d5)
                      00:1d.0 USB controller [0c03]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family USB EHCI #1 [8086:8c26] (rev 05)
                      00:1f.0 ISA bridge [0601]: Intel Corporation Z87 Express LPC Controller [8086:8c44] (rev 05)
                      00:1f.2 RAID bus controller [0104]: Intel Corporation SATA Controller [RAID mode] [8086:2822] (rev 05)
                      00:1f.3 SMBus [0c05]: Intel Corporation 8 Series/C220 Series Chipset Family SMBus Controller [8086:8c22] (rev 05)
                      01:00.0 VGA compatible controller [0300]: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Ellesmere [Radeon RX 470/480/570/570X/580/580X/590] [1002:67df] (rev c7)
                      01:00.1 Audio device [0403]: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI] Ellesmere HDMI Audio [Radeon RX 470/480 / 570/580/590] [1002:aaf0]
                      03:00.0 Network controller [0280]: Qualcomm Atheros AR93xx Wireless Network Adapter [168c:0030] (rev 01)
                      05:00.0 PCI bridge [0604]: ASMedia Technology Inc. ASM1083/1085 PCIe to PCI Bridge [1b21:1080] (rev 03)
                      Seriously considering an Intel cpu + AMD gpu for my next setup. I don't want *any* of these f'n problems with my new computer.

                      Intel I *know* cares about getting this stuff working. Not a knock on AMD (but also a slight knock) because Lisu Su and them have done incredible work.

                      But right now? My i5-4670K / RX480 8GB is King and perfect for me and no one can tell me otherwise. Latest isn't always greatest.

                      If you're on new hardware with zero crashes and full stability, a) consider yourself lucky b) make a back up of your current configuration c) make another back up and write it down again

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