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The New NTFS File-System Driver Has Been Submitted For Linux 5.15

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  • #21
    There is still a question I need answers to. With this finally have a Linux based chkdsk/fsck tool. Not the ntfsfix of the past that basically says reboot into window to repair the drive.

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    • #22
      Why it's not Microsoft that takes care of it?
      They could put a few specialized engineers on it to convert their existing fs for linux.

      We love Linux, but we don't care.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by oiaohm View Post
        There is still a question I need answers to. With this finally have a Linux based chkdsk/fsck tool. Not the ntfsfix of the past that basically says reboot into window to repair the drive.
        They have a faq which answers many questions:

        https://www.paragon-software.com/home/ntfs3-driver-faq/

        It seems their commercial offering is a different codebase, and they still sell it. (It also supports HFS+) That includes a chkntfs utility. They mention open sourcing a mkfs.NTFS utility and possibly some others, but do not mention a checking tool. I glanced thru their github page and did not see any utilities yet:

        https://github.com/Paragon-Software-Group

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        • #24
          Windows filesystems? Who cares anyway.

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          • #25
            Where's the out of tree module for older kernels at?

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            • #26
              Originally posted by avem View Post
              NTFS-3G used to corrupt NTFS partitions when being used for downloading torrents, has anyone tried the kernel NTFS driver for the same purpose?

              And while this is great news, we still need chkdsk
              Yeah but the issues have been mostly fixed in the latest ntfs3 update. I've been having filesystem corruption for a while before that but it wasn't causing me to loose files, just to loose journal data which win10 fixes and restores the file locations.

              Using Xanmod 5.14-1 atm, seems fine.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by polarathene View Post

                Is there more info about the structure there for those less familiar? Not sure why the main branch continues to retain dev versions of prior kernels around? Looking at some like 5.10 and 5.14, I see folders with different versions or suffixes like `-sep`. Is he making updates via new folders instead of updating the original folder for a patch?

                The BMQ link needs to be updated to reference PRJC (which it will redirect to now as BMQ has been folded into Alfred's Project C since mid 2020?).

                I'm a little confused why 5.14 has BFQ patches, I thought this was already upstreamed? Looking at the two BFQ links from the README, one hasn't been updated since 2016, the other says it's development version of BFQ but it was last updated in Jan 2021 on a branch for 5.6 kernel..?
                Yes please. I'm trying to understand the structure there. That seems like a nice repo

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by polarathene View Post

                  Is there more info about the structure there for those less familiar? Not sure why the main branch continues to retain dev versions of prior kernels around? Looking at some like 5.10 and 5.14, I see folders with different versions or suffixes like `-sep`. Is he making updates via new folders instead of updating the original folder for a patch?

                  The BMQ link needs to be updated to reference PRJC (which it will redirect to now as BMQ has been folded into Alfred's Project C since mid 2020?).

                  I'm a little confused why 5.14 has BFQ patches, I thought this was already upstreamed? Looking at the two BFQ links from the README, one hasn't been updated since 2016, the other says it's development version of BFQ but it was last updated in Jan 2021 on a branch for 5.6 kernel..?
                  To try to help a bit, -sep stands for separate or separated. For example, NTFS has 35 patches that need to be applied and those are all laid out one by one in the -sep folder whereas they're all combined in the non -sep folder. I reckon they're both there for a mix of ease of use and debugging.

                  Some of the rest of it, however, a person needs to be a bit more in the know and up-to-date in regards to the kernel, actively worked on patches, etc.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by piorunz View Post
                    Windows filesystems? Who cares anyway.
                    Everyone?

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by jacob View Post

                      Everyone?
                      Everyone uses Windows filesystems? Sorry I am not part of your cult.

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