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Linux Could Use A New Maintainer For Its CD-ROM Code

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  • onlyLinuxLuvUBack
    replied
    Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post

    Archive quality optical media should be fine long term. Random recordable CD/DVD probably not so much.

    Flash retention is normally given as ~10 years, YMMV. Power cycling it every few years should help though.
    I like to rewrite all data after 3 months to another drive and rotate if you trust/believe in flash.

    Leave a comment:


  • baka0815
    replied
    As dvdisaster is EOL, does anyone know of a replacement?

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  • onlyLinuxLuvUBack
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    How much maintenance is even necessary for this? I imagine there aren't really any open bugs or compatibility issues, so, what exactly is Jens having a hard time keeping up with? Regardless, it's still good to have a replacement now, while Jens is still available for help if necessary.


    There aren't really any cheap options, though, flash memory seems to be a decent middle-ground for reliability and cost. Optical discs are better if you keep them in a dark place that doesn't face extreme temperatures.
    what's wrong with 3 copies?

    1 m-disc blu-ray 100GB,
    2 take iso from blu-ray encrypt with password upload to glacier slow aws cloud storage ( try not to access often to stay cheap rate )
    3 leave iso on hdd or sdd or whatever you think like hdd, micron max ssd or intel optane or the sas tape

    also, if you want you could use half blu-ray area and store two copies of the file or use half then par2 parity?
    also buy extra blu-ray drive or two and leave it in box
    or grab dirtee before .iso and encrypt each file and then upload individual files to glacier aws cold store?

    Leave a comment:


  • marlock
    replied
    homemade solution:

    put all your digital library in a huge HDD, then get a new HDD and sync it

    use one as NAS storage plugged in to every tv in your home via attached sticks or SBCs with media center software such as Kodi, so you have an active drive with all your stuff in a way you can actually enjoy it and notice as soon as it starts having issues

    keep the backup in a dry and physically safe cabinet, unplugged except when syncing

    when the active drive goes bust, promote the backup to active, and get a new backup

    digital files don't reeeeealy need everlasting media, they can outlive media with zero degradation if you keep them in redundant storage

    make a 3rd copy and take it offsite, transporting it back periodically for local sync or or place it in a personal cloud space, for a more frequent remote sync... then you get a boost to natural catastrophy, theft and fire protection

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    How much maintenance is even necessary for this? I imagine there aren't really any open bugs or compatibility issues, so, what exactly is Jens having a hard time keeping up with? Regardless, it's still good to have a replacement now, while Jens is still available for help if necessary.

    Originally posted by doomie View Post
    Perhaps a pertinent topic, does anyone know what is currently accepted as the most long-term durable way to store data? I've heard conflicting things about optical and flash, and I'm sure specific tech and products make a difference...
    There aren't really any cheap options, though, flash memory seems to be a decent middle-ground for reliability and cost. Optical discs are better if you keep them in a dark place that doesn't face extreme temperatures.

    Leave a comment:


  • sinepgib
    replied
    Originally posted by doomie View Post
    Perhaps a pertinent topic, does anyone know what is currently accepted as the most long-term durable way to store data? I've heard conflicting things about optical and flash, and I'm sure specific tech and products make a difference...
    I can't tell if it's just tradition or based on technical merits, but I've seen places that still do critical backups on tape. But AFAIR that's just a matter of capacity per dollar, right? I'm not 100% it's even meant for long term, as those would be weekly backups and the like, so the oldest you're likely to use is a week old.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post

    Archive quality optical media should be fine long term. Random recordable CD/DVD probably not so much.

    Flash retention is normally given as ~10 years, YMMV. Power cycling it every few years should help though.
    It's surprising how bad some old flash drives are. I found one old samsung evo 840 drive. Even after wiping the old stuff, sustained write speed is like 30-40 MB/s (sata3). Old usb2 keys might have a write speed of 0,5 - 2 MB/s. I wonder if they've gotten slower over time.

    Leave a comment:


  • ssokolow
    replied
    When is the last time you've used a CD/DVD drive on Linux?
    Yesterday.

    I still have about ten 100-disc cakebox spindles of archival-grade JVC Taiyo Yuden DVD+Rs that I stockpiled back before the supply chain dried up and I use them for making backups (dvdisaster ECC-augmented) that don't require a horrendously expensive recovery service if the drive electronics or mechanics fail, and, even if that weren't the case, I just ripped a bunch of game resources for ScummVM yesterday.

    In fact, I had to plug a couple of them into my airgapped Windows XP retro PC along with a USB stick, because Linux apparently lost the ability to read standard-noncompliant 512-byte sectored ISO9660 filesystems somewhere around v2.2 (and SHSUCDX from FreeDOS aped that limitation). (Yes, I reported it years ago.)

    Leave a comment:


  • uxmkt
    replied
    Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
    Archive quality optical media should be fine long term. Random recordable CD/DVD probably not so much.
    Archival Disc? Sounds reeally niche. And its media cost is probably not worth the trouble. Serious people will just put it to tape, as they have always done - and the infrastructure already exists.

    Secondly, if your storage farm is "big enough", storing a bunch of blurays on flash, nonwithstanding flash's failure rate, having just one storage type around means that your so-copied blurays benefit from the regular harddisk/flash replacement pace that your storage system already had to go through anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • PluMGMK
    replied
    I have a machine running MythTV that I use to watch DVDs on a regular basis. For some reason MythTV sometimes freezes when trying to play a new disc, and the machine needs a reboot before it'll read it properly. No idea where the issue is (hardware / kernel / software)…

    Leave a comment:

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