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Samsung Revs Its In-Kernel SMB3 Server Focused On Fast Performance, New Features

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  • Samsung Revs Its In-Kernel SMB3 Server Focused On Fast Performance, New Features

    Phoronix: Samsung Revs Its In-Kernel SMB3 Server Focused On Fast Performance, New Features

    While Samba is well known for SMB/CIFS server support on Linux and other platforms for supporting Microsoft's SMB networking protocol for file and print services, Samba is implemented in user-space while Samsung has been pursuing an SMB server implemented in kernel-space for better performance and wiring up new features that can be more easily accomplished within the kernel...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...msung-KSMBD-v7

  • #2
    I hope this will be disabled by default

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    • #3
      Forget SMB, it's 2021 and everything is in the cloud. Can someone get a high performance DAVfs implementation going. The current FUSE implementation is slow as molasses.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by xcom View Post
        I hope this will be disabled by default
        Usage or functionality? I doubt that the Kernel Shares per default ,some Folders or Listen on the Ports for it if nothing is setup. But i will test this asap and replace samba as fast as i could.

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        • #5
          How is this supposed to work? Will it integrate with and complement samba or will it have completely separate user space programs to control it?

          I read through the cover letter of the patch thread, but it still isn't entirely clear to me.

          On one hand it reads "will continue to integrate well with Samba user space tools and libraries where appropriate.", but then later on it mentions having its own daemon which listens on port 445.

          To be honest I'm a bit fuzzy on exactly how smb works (I know various parts use different ports). Does this mean that samba will continue to serve the other ports used by Windows file sharing and the kernel implementation will handle everything on port 445?

          What about printer sharing (which I thought happened on top of special file shares) or network browsing for example? What about domain server things?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
            Forget SMB, it's 2021 and everything is in the cloud. Can someone get a high performance DAVfs implementation going. The current FUSE implementation is slow as molasses.
            So what? Until the cloud isn't at the minimally hampered by bandwidth limitations, decrepit infrastructure or lack of infrastructure, and unfair and noncompetitive pricing in regards to the internet and the services provided on the cloud, the cloud really doesn't matter all that much. When you have the privilege of spending $90 a month for internet that might go out with a swift wind and has bandwidth limitations after 1TB you'll look at things like the cloud differently than other people would. Oh look, yet another cloud service to use up my bandwidth allocation. I miss the days were I'd download a program and use it. Clouds and services and crappy ISPs all seem like nickel-and-dime fee scam that they're all in on together.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Vorpal View Post
              How is this supposed to work? Will it integrate with and complement samba or will it have completely separate user space programs to control it?
              It has its own tools, however the file syntax for configuration is the same. Using ksmbd via dkms currently, just copied the relevant share over and it works perfectly.

              Originally posted by Vorpal View Post
              On one hand it reads "will continue to integrate well with Samba user space tools and libraries where appropriate.", but then later on it mentions having its own daemon which listens on port 445.
              As far as I understand, this refers to stuff that Samba does but ksmbd doesn't, e.g. active directory.

              [QUOTE=Vorpal;n1271745]What about printer sharing (which I thought happened on top of special file shares) or network browsing for example?[QUOTE]No printing. You need to use Samba for that. The scope of ksmbd is similar to NFS in the kernel, except that ksmbd also does user management.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Laser View Post
                No printing. You need to use Samba for that. The scope of ksmbd is similar to NFS in the kernel, except that ksmbd also does user management.
                That's a shame. I use my raspberry pi 4 as a file and print server. For Linux cups and nfs offers good enough performance, but for Windows clients it has always been a bit slow.

                I was hoping this might help. But if I can't do both file and printer sharing it won't work. Maybe I could have two IP addresses bound and offer two different servers. No idea if that plays well with Samba and ksmbd though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
                  Forget SMB, it's 2021 and everything is in the cloud. Can someone get a high performance DAVfs implementation going. The current FUSE implementation is slow as molasses.
                  You forget that there are many small devices (IoT) that run Linux, but also get used in Windows networks. From routers and access points with network-attached storage, to printers, and even vacuum cleaners, washing machines, TVs and Hifi, and of course not to forget mobile phones and tablets. These all can benefit from a faster, in-kernel SMB file system.

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                  • #10
                    An SMB server seems like the perfect place to use Rust in the kernel... network, filesystem and userspace interaction as attack surfaces, lots of untrusted input...

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