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Linux Regressed Its Floppy Disk Driver - Someone Actually Noticed Just A Few Months Later

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  • #11
    I use floppies all the time... not the true old physical floppy drives, but usb floppy drives, and I use them to move configuration files or code between physically separated networks that we're not allowed to use flash storage media on. I can take code from one network, write protect the floppy, and then put it on the other network.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by MadeUpName View Post
      I don't think any one still makes floppies and you can only use one so many times before it fails so how much use can there be?
      Guess again. Walmart and Amazon and BestBuy sell them, for starters.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by MadeUpName View Post
        Didn't they drop the IDE code a while ago as well?
        No. They only dropped old implementation of IDE.

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        • #14
          it's increasingly rare to find vintage computer owners running modern versions of the Linux kernel
          I have an AMD Piledriver motherboard that has a floppy controller (IDE as well, come to that). Floppy drives are not exactly confined to vintage computers. While AMD FX series CPUs are pretty slow, they're not that dire yet, and run modern Linux quite happily.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by thunderbird32 View Post

            I have an AMD Piledriver motherboard that has a floppy controller (IDE as well, come to that). Floppy drives are not exactly confined to vintage computers. While AMD FX series CPUs are pretty slow, they're not that dire yet, and run modern Linux quite happily.
            In my case, it's an LGA 775-based system. Threw a 4 core Xeon in for like 10 bucks for a bit extra performance (look up tutorials for using an old LGA 771 Xeon in a 775 system). It's mainly used as a long-term file storage device nowadays, so I have a floppy drive in there to allow easy data transfer from old systems (though I do also have a couple of USB floppy drives I picked up through the years.)

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            • #16
              Originally posted by krzyzowiec View Post
              I see an easy solution to this problem. Dump the floppy drive code.
              If you will ever own a factory with some old but working machinery, which uses floppy disk for design transfer, you will think otherwise.
              And replacing it with a new machine costs 100.000€.
              It is actually ecological to keep the old machine running as long as possible, if the manufactured product is still good, and energy consumption is not excessive.

              In some of those old machinery, the problem can be solved with a floppy emulator
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taFP1J_lZBI
              You see that just this video has 260.000 views, so there is considerable need for these solutions.

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              • #17
                Buy a USB floppy drive?

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by dpeterc View Post

                  If you will ever own a factory with some old but working machinery, which uses floppy disk for design transfer, you will think otherwise.
                  And replacing it with a new machine costs 100.000€.
                  It is actually ecological to keep the old machine running as long as possible, if the manufactured product is still good, and energy consumption is not excessive.

                  In some of those old machinery, the problem can be solved with a floppy emulator
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taFP1J_lZBI
                  You see that just this video has 260.000 views, so there is considerable need for these solutions.
                  I know and support all of that. But why do such machines need to be running the most up to date Linux distributions? If it's some old machine in a factory, it shouldn't be updated at all. Don't touch what isn't broken.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by krzyzowiec View Post
                    I know and support all of that. But why do such machines need to be running the most up to date Linux distributions? If it's some old machine in a factory, it shouldn't be updated at all. Don't touch what isn't broken.
                    Those machines don't. It's the relatively modern internet-connected PC sitting next to it that does. That's the PC that typically *writes* manufacturing designs to the floppy disk. Then you eject the disk and feed it into the old factory machine, which typically only reads from it, and likely isn't even running Linux.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                      Those machines don't. It's the relatively modern internet-connected PC sitting next to it that does. That's the PC that typically *writes* manufacturing designs to the floppy disk. Then you eject the disk and feed it into the old factory machine, which typically only reads from it, and likely isn't even running Linux.
                      Well if it's a new computer, can't you just use a usb connected floppy drive?

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