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BLAKE3 v1.0 Released - Faster & More Secure Than SHA-1, Etc

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  • wswartzendruber
    replied
    All right! A massively parallel, SIMD-friendly hash algorithm with seemingly every strength and no weaknesses.

    Yet for some reason, NSA conspiracy theories are much more attractive.

    Leave a comment:


  • mb_q
    replied
    A new way to make a cryptocurrency and a new way to write broken password handling subsystem...
    Yet, 17x faster than SHA-3, apparently no padding problems, and the reference implementation is written in Rust.

    Leave a comment:


  • Volta
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post

    No, it does not.

    The U.S government is very interested in having secure algorithms that companies can use and be secure against espionage from rival powers.
    There are no rival powers. They're all ruled by the same POS.

    Leave a comment:


  • ServerGarbage
    replied
    Originally posted by chuckula View Post
    11 posts of NSA conspiracy theories and not one quip about waiting for Blake's 7?

    Sad.
    With the NSA history calling the discussion conspiracy can age as good as milk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paradigm Shifter
    replied
    Originally posted by chuckula View Post
    11 posts of NSA conspiracy theories and not one quip about waiting for Blake's 7?

    Sad.
    Why is it that recently when I find time to pop on Phoronix, someone is reminding me of old TV shows?

    ...another one I want to watch.

    ...

    On topic, however... I've got a lot of reading to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • onlyLinuxLuvUBack
    replied
    Originally posted by taupter View Post

    Dear person, I came here for this sole purpose, to comment we'll now wait for the other four to complete Blake's 7. You came first, so at least I'm happy I'm not the only one.
    I'm waiting for AVON1 , because we know that is the survivor.

    Leave a comment:


  • taupter
    replied
    Originally posted by chuckula View Post
    11 posts of NSA conspiracy theories and not one quip about waiting for Blake's 7?

    Sad.
    Dear person, I came here for this sole purpose, to comment we'll now wait for the other four to complete Blake's 7. You came first, so at least I'm happy I'm not the only one.

    Leave a comment:


  • chuckula
    replied
    11 posts of NSA conspiracy theories and not one quip about waiting for Blake's 7?

    Sad.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadeUpName
    replied
    Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post

    I think you are referring to the S-boxes in SHA1. Yes - no-one understood what they did at the time and it was suspicious, but they held up cryptanalysis for 5 years more than the algorithm would have without them. Since then we realised "hey, maybe those guys did know what they were doing"
    I'm refering to this.
    https://www.wired.com/2007/11/securitymatters-1115/

    But while we are at it lets not forget NSA & RSA payoff
    https://www.pcmag.com/news/report-ns...ption-software

    Then there is the good old clipper chip.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipper_chip

    Any one claiming the NSA is here to help businesses stay safe is delusional. Don't forget all those big hacks in the US recently that they claim were RUSSIA,,RUSSIA,RUSSIA were all based on exploit software written by the NSA.

    Leave a comment:


  • xnor
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    No, it does not.

    The U.S government is very interested in having secure algorithms that companies can use and be secure against espionage from rival powers.
    Yes, it almost certainly does. The algorithms the NSA recommends are different from those that are used for high-defense, military applications.
    The publicly recommended algorithms should only be used for short-time, temporary storage in military applications according to NSA's own internal documents.

    Leave a comment:

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