Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GNU Linux-libre 5.13-gnu Released For The Latest Kernel Deblobbing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • GNU Linux-libre 5.13-gnu Released For The Latest Kernel Deblobbing

    Phoronix: GNU Linux-libre 5.13-gnu Released For The Latest Kernel Deblobbing

    Following yesterday's release of the Linux 5.13 kernel, the GNU folks have released GNU Linux-libre 5.13-gnu as their downstream that strips out support for loading binary-only firmware/microcode, blocks the ability to load binary-only kernel modules, and other sanitization work in the name of software freedom...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...nux-Libre-5.13

  • #2
    Is it really "freedom" if it doesn't run on anything?

    From what I know (so not much) Raptor computing is about the furthest ahead on all fully open sourced hardware, but even with them there are pieces that still require blobs to load.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by zexelon View Post
      Is it really "freedom" if it doesn't run on anything?
      It is still quite useful to keep it idling along for a time when open hardware does start to exist. Maintaining it change by change will be a lot easier than suddenly doing it from scratch.

      I suppose there was once a time when Linux in general didn't run on most common devices. Things have luckily changed for the best and now Linux probably supports more hardware than any other OS.

      Comment


      • #4
        The lack of freedom to run software/drivers is not freedom.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
          I suppose there was once a time when Linux in general didn't run on most common devices. Things have luckily changed for the best and now Linux probably supports more hardware than any other OS.
          That is a fair point for sure. That said, it does not look like there is much of a future in OS hardware, especially complex items like GPUs, the RISC-V cpu is a case in point its still more of an academic adventure then a product we will see in phones, set-top boxes or much less personal computers.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by zexelon View Post
            Is it really "freedom" if it doesn't run on anything?

            From what I know (so not much) Raptor computing is about the furthest ahead on all fully open sourced hardware, but even with them there are pieces that still require blobs to load.
            <cue someone bringing in that Franklin quote about giving up freedoms> I'm so tired of reading that line. Overused and misunderstood. There's very little entirely 'free' hardware out there, and what there is, is impractically slow for most users. Let the libre folks have their insecure but "free" kernel, it's really no skin off anyone else's nose - unless they get suborned into a botnet. But you're right in the matter of freedom. Without giving up some freedoms society can't function (you get anarchy - society collapses). Likewise, without giving up some freedoms you can't use most modern computer hardware. Taking that kind of stand when the practical results are Pyrrhic is irrational to me.

            Comment


            • #7
              How does “blocking” usage of anything the user wishes to install “freedom”???

              Comment


              • #8
                Smooth brain posts at each Linux-libre release. Are you guys like, 12? If you want to know what makes libre software libre, don't wast your time here and go to GNU (still can't read or entertain concepts such as pareto-efficiency in your head? Too bad!). If you want to know what makes Linux-libre actually practical, imagine simply wanting to be sure no blobs can be loaded. Easy usecase, right?

                Comment


                • #9
                  What is all this stuff with Linux Libre being useless? I use it on Libreboot laptops which run as servers. Some lucky people use it on other hardware from that era which is pretty decent for most server workloads. For example it makes for a great and secure mail server, which can be desirable.

                  On my main workstation rig, where I just run KVM virtual machines for better management, the physical host runs Debian which also uses the deblobbed Linux kernel (it should be the same thing as Linux-libre). Before I switched to Debian in 2019 for more space between updates, I ran Parabola with libre stuff. I am not aware of anything not working.

                  I also don't really care if my main workstation runs libre software (in VMs I simply run Windows or even macOS), but since I have a lot of Libreboot machines, I prefer to keep the setup same everywhere (automated through ansible, autoupdates, worry free).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Congrats to Linux-libre folks on another release. Just installed and booted it and so far so good.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X