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OpenZFS 2.1-rc3 Delivers More Fixes

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  • OpenZFS 2.1-rc3 Delivers More Fixes

    Phoronix: OpenZFS 2.1-rc3 Delivers More Fixes

    OpenZFS 2.1 is nearing release as the next feature update to this open-source ZFS file-system implementation currently supporting Linux and FreeBSD systems...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...1-rc3-Released

  • #2
    I wonder if NetBSD will rebase to openzfs? Then if we could just get the Illuminos folks to rebase and that Windows port sorted out then every major OS except OpenBSD will have ZFS support! It would become the new fat32 except be able to handle large volumes and files bigger than 4GB.

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    • #3
      What about DildOS?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
        I wonder if NetBSD will rebase to openzfs? Then if we could just get the Illuminos folks to rebase and that Windows port sorted out then every major OS except OpenBSD will have ZFS support! It would become the new fat32 except be able to handle large volumes and files bigger than 4GB.
        I wouldn't hold my breath on becoming ubiquitous as FAT32. It'd have to have built in support from every major manufacturer with similar ease of use as FAT32, which it doesn't and won't. This is what exFAT is for. Still, might be the only way OpenBSD would end up with TRIM support. I won't touch the OS any more because its antiquated file system lacks adequate support for modern storage devices - especially if the storage device is built into the overall system.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
          I wouldn't hold my breath on becoming ubiquitous as FAT32.
          Of course not, the CPU and memory requirements alone will rule out basically every FAT32 use case. ZFS is a big heavy filesystem and requires a fast modern CPU with lots of RAM. The idea that ZFS will displace FAT32 is like thinking AMD EPYC will replace the CPU in your mobile phone or digital camera. Opposite ends of the spectrum, not even in the ballpark.

          Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
          This is what exFAT is for.
          Exactly.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
            Of course not, the CPU and memory requirements alone will rule out basically every FAT32 use case. ZFS is a big heavy filesystem and requires a fast modern CPU with lots of RAM. The idea that ZFS will displace FAT32 is like thinking AMD EPYC will replace the CPU in your mobile phone or digital camera. Opposite ends of the spectrum, not even in the ballpark.
            Absolutely great for my Haswell Xeon ECC RAM workstation with two RAID0 arrays. Totally the wrong tool for the job for temporary storage. I could just imagine the torture of trying to instruct my 70 year old mom in trying to import/export/tune ZFS on a 64 GB flash stick. If you're using FAT32 for anything other than small scale temporary storage (or EFI partitions) at this point, you're doing it wrong.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

              Absolutely great for my Haswell Xeon ECC RAM workstation with two RAID0 arrays. Totally the wrong tool for the job for temporary storage. I could just imagine the torture of trying to instruct my 70 year old mom in trying to import/export/tune ZFS on a 64 GB flash stick. If you're using FAT32 for anything other than small scale temporary storage (or EFI partitions) at this point, you're doing it wrong.
              I guess the closest thing to a universal filesystem that doesn't share FAT32's limitations is EXT2. I've used that to move files between *BSDs and Windows and Linux. Not too sure on its MacOS support or Illuminos Distros support though. ExFAT may get there someday but not anytime soon. You can always tar to a device and use it like a tape drive but I don't consider that safe, way too easy to overwrite the tar archive thinking it is an unformatted drive but tons of people recommend it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kylew77 View Post
                I guess the closest thing to a universal filesystem that doesn't share FAT32's limitations is EXT2. I've used that to move files between *BSDs and Windows and Linux. Not too sure on its MacOS support or Illuminos Distros support though. ExFAT may get there someday but not anytime soon. You can always tar to a device and use it like a tape drive but I don't consider that safe, way too easy to overwrite the tar archive thinking it is an unformatted drive but tons of people recommend it.
                What about UDF? I've used it some time ago between macOS, Windows and Linux. It required a bit of fiddling to get the USB stick compatible, but worked fine. It should work in *BSDs, but I haven't tested that.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by numacross View Post

                  What about UDF? I've used it some time ago between macOS, Windows and Linux. It required a bit of fiddling to get the USB stick compatible, but worked fine. It should work in *BSDs, but I haven't tested that.
                  Wikipedia reports read only on the 3 big *BSDs thought it is a bit outdated. Checking the OpenBSD man pages indicate that even in -current it is read only.

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