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Celebrate The Christmas Season With Some Wine: Wine 6.0-RC4 Released

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  • Celebrate The Christmas Season With Some Wine: Wine 6.0-RC4 Released

    Phoronix: Celebrate The Christmas Season With Some Wine: Wine 6.0-RC4 Released

    While being released one day late due to Christmas, Wine 6.0-RC4 is out. This is the latest weekly test candidate of the forthcoming Wine 6.0 as the annual stable release due out in January for this leading software to run Windows programs/games on Linux, macOS, and the BSDs...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...0-RC4-Released

  • #2
    Is there any ETA on spatial audio patches landing in upstream Wine? Right now they are only in Proton experimental and they are needed for Cyberpunk 2077.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by shmerl View Post
      Is there any ETA on spatial audio patches landing in upstream Wine? Right now they are only in Proton experimental and they are needed for Cyberpunk 2077.
      Not to sidetrack your point, but in case you didn't play it and hope to do it on Linux - many people found this game overrated & boring (including me).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cl333r View Post

        Not to sidetrack your point, but in case you didn't play it and hope to do it on Linux - many people found this game overrated & boring (including me).
        the game is fine if you ignore the CDP press and execs, game is still less buggy than witcher 3 was on PC. i think its pretty fun if you cam ignore the buggyness.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

          the game is fine if you ignore the CDP press and execs, game is still less buggy than witcher 3 was on PC. i think its pretty fun if you cam ignore the buggyness.
          While the game has clear and obvious issues and annoyances, it's still fun and has a good story. That said, if it weren't for the fact that I'm on PC with access to all the community fixes I'd be a hell of a lot more upset. My Dad has it on PS4 and it's just an atrocious game. What really sucks is that this is the first ever real RPG he's ever played so I'm trying to teach a 60yo about RNGs, leveled items, stats, etc .

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
            While the game has clear and obvious issues and annoyances, it's still fun and has a good story. That said, if it weren't for the fact that I'm on PC with access to all the community fixes I'd be a hell of a lot more upset. My Dad has it on PS4 and it's just an atrocious game. What really sucks is that this is the first ever real RPG he's ever played so I'm trying to teach a 60yo about RNGs, leveled items, stats, etc .
            You got a just-launched, complex FPS-RPG for someone as their first CRPG? I'd have gone with one of the Shadowrun games (if the defining requirement was "cyberpunk") or Baldur's Gate first... props to both of you for that choice! Or Deus Ex, if FPS was needed.

            I really don't know why anyone expected anything different from CDPR at launch; I bought The Witcher by random-chance-bored-moment shortly after it came out in the UK and it was so buggy I actually managed to convince the store to let me return it for a refund (which is/was one Hell of an achievement for PC games in the UK...). I was late to The Witcher 3 (bought when Blood and Wine released) and still had several, um... "interesting" bugs manifest when playing.

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            • #7
              This software is a junk even after 20 years I would be surprised if it could run minesweeper of mspaint without tons of bugs and crashes.
              If something should've died that should be Wine instead of CUPS.

              Vmware, Virtualbox, Dosbox beats this to the punch not to mention the PCI passthrough feature in KVM where you can install something like Win10 inside KVM and have it access an RTX card directly on the host and take full advantage of the hw.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by iamjustalittlefox View Post
                This software is a junk even after 20 years I would be surprised if it could run minesweeper of mspaint without tons of bugs and crashes.
                If something should've died that should be Wine instead of CUPS.

                Vmware, Virtualbox, Dosbox beats this to the punch not to mention the PCI passthrough feature in KVM where you can install something like Win10 inside KVM and have it access an RTX card directly on the host and take full advantage of the hw.
                This is a troll right? I'll take the bait just in case someone will actually believe you.

                Emulation + PCI pasthrough:
                - Requires a dedicated GPU (1 for the host, 1 for the guest).
                - Is more difficult to setup.
                - Perfect compatibility, but is still emulation and therefore performance penalties to both computation and I/O are inevitable.
                - Requires a Windows License (unless you decide to crack it).
                - Comes with all the bloat, telemetry and spyware that Windows forces upon its users. This is very difficult, if not impossible to disable entirely.
                - Forced Windows Updates.
                - Is inherently more secure from malware due to being run in a VM. This is only true if whatever you're doing will never get out of the box. If you're authenticating yourself for some service/website inside the VM, you might still need an AntiVirus to protect your credentials or whatever services you're using. Also files that you use in a contaminated VM can leak malware to other places if you decide to transfer them to a friend or another device, so an AV might be needed for this reason as well.

                Wine/Proton(-GE) + DXVK:
                - No dedicated HW required.
                - Is moderately easy to setup (Lutris/Steam) with plenty of tutorials online.
                - Runs Windows applications natively, albeit on a compatibility layer. This layer isn't perfect, but it's really good. Near-Windows performance on some modern games has been achieved with DXVK. Sometimes it even runs better than on native Windows.
                - Is completely free.
                - Has no built-in bloat, telemetry or spyware. The only way for you to encounter these things is from apps you're trying to run.
                - You have full control over which version to use (no forced updates).
                - Extra steps required to make sure malware cannot escape to the rest of the system. This is a non-issue if you run games/apps from trusted sources. (Highly recommended tools for signature verification in case you got a trusted app from a dodgy source: osslsigncode and innoextract.)


                Wine is a pragmatic way to independence from Microsoft and Windows, while VMs keep you involuntarily hooked.
                Last edited by board; 28 December 2020, 06:33 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by board View Post

                  This is a troll right? I'll take the bait just in case someone will actually believe you.

                  Emulation + PCI pasthrough:
                  - Requires a dedicated GPU (1 for the host, 1 for the guest).
                  - Is more difficult to setup.
                  - Perfect compatibility, but is still emulation and therefore performance penalties to both computation and I/O are inevitable.
                  - Requires a Windows License (unless you decide to crack it).
                  - Comes with all the bloat, telemetry and spyware that Windows forces upon its users. This is very difficult, if not impossible to disable entirely.
                  - Forced Windows Updates.
                  - Is inherently more secure from malware due to being run in a VM. This is only true if whatever you're doing will never get out of the box. If you're authenticating yourself for some service/website inside the VM, you might still need an AntiVirus to protect your credentials or whatever services you're using. Also files that you use in a contaminated VM can leak malware to other places if you decide to transfer them to a friend or another device, so an AV might be needed for this reason as well.

                  Wine/Proton(-GE) + DXVK:
                  - No dedicated HW required.
                  - Is moderately easy to setup (Lutris/Steam) with plenty of tutorials online.
                  - Runs Windows applications natively, albeit on a compatibility layer. This layer isn't perfect, but it's really good. Near-Windows performance on some modern games has been achieved with DXVK. Sometimes it even runs better than on native Windows.
                  - Is completely free.
                  - Has no built-in bloat, telemetry or spyware. The only way for you to encounter these things is from apps you're trying to run.
                  - You have full control over which version to use (no forced updates).
                  - Extra steps required to make sure malware cannot escape to the rest of the system. This is a non-issue if you run games/apps from trusted sources. (Highly recommended tools for signature verification in case you got a trusted app from a dodgy source: osslsigncode and innoextract.)


                  Wine is a pragmatic way to independence from Microsoft and Windows, while VMs keep you involuntarily hooked.
                  Both have their uses and places. I prefer both; and the only reason I'm not doing both is system limitations. But if I can run it close to or better than Windows with Wine/Proton then that's what I'll do. If it doesn't work there then Windows in a VM (or dual booting in my case).

                  That said, I'm designing my next PC based upon Emulation + PCI Passthrough. I just like the idea of using a container OS and then running other operating systems and desktops from there. I've accepted that Windows in a necessary evil and know that I'll have to keep it around just in case. I figure that if I have to keep it around I'd rather it be in a VM than bare metal.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paradigm Shifter View Post
                    You got a just-launched, complex FPS-RPG for someone as their first CRPG? I'd have gone with one of the Shadowrun games (if the defining requirement was "cyberpunk") or Baldur's Gate first... props to both of you for that choice! Or Deus Ex, if FPS was needed.

                    I really don't know why anyone expected anything different from CDPR at launch; I bought The Witcher by random-chance-bored-moment shortly after it came out in the UK and it was so buggy I actually managed to convince the store to let me return it for a refund (which is/was one Hell of an achievement for PC games in the UK...). I was late to The Witcher 3 (bought when Blood and Wine released) and still had several, um... "interesting" bugs manifest when playing.
                    He bought it based on TV commercials and Google news feed hype not even knowing what kind of game it was. I didn't buy it until I watched him play it and said to myself "I bet all this bullshit is fixable on PC"....and it is. When I saw the stat point distribution when he started the game I just thought "Fuck me running, we're in for a ride" because I don't think he's ever played a game that had stat points or skill trees. "Leveling up" in GTA games is as close as it gets for him.

                    "Oh this game has MAGIC in it. I'm not playing this fake bullshit. Put in Tomb Raider."
                    --My Dad on Every Fantasy Game Ever

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