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XFS Lands More Code For Linux 5.10 - "Even More Monumental"

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  • XFS Lands More Code For Linux 5.10 - "Even More Monumental"

    Phoronix: XFS Lands More Code For Linux 5.10 - "Even More Monumental"

    Last week saw the XFS file-system with Linux 5.10 support timestamps until the year 2486 rather than year 2038 and other improvements too. This week a second round of XFS work has landed for Linux 5.10...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...5.10-Round-Two

  • #2
    Is XFS the only file system that safe beyond year 2030?

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    • #3
      It is sad that XFS still fails to support shrinking. A major failure for all major cloud systems that must offer live expand/shrink for virtual containers.

      No matter what other features they implement, without shrink support, xfs will only be a footnote in the history of file systems.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        Is XFS the only file system that safe beyond year 2030?
        A quick test with ext4 shows no problems, though it won't go past 2446-05-10.

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        • #5
          There shoul be a "notimestanp" option for time travellers and such.
          Forward time traveling is a real thing.

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          • #6
            I will wait till 31 December 2029 before I upgrade to v5 format ...
            Last edited by Raka555; 20 October 2020, 09:19 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jaxad0127 View Post

              A quick test with ext4 shows no problems, though it won't go past 2446-05-10.
              ext4 is only safe if you are using 256-byte inodes. If you are using 128-byte inodes (older filesystems, small filesystems, or filesystems created with a misconfigured /etc/mke2fs.conf) it's not Y2038-safe. See https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/late...ode-timestamps for details.

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              • #8
                NILFS2 is both shrinkable, and supports 64-bit timestamps

                Other NILFS features include:
                • B-tree based file and inode management.
                • Immediate recovery after system crash.
                • 64-bit data structures; support many files, large files and disks.
                • 64-bit on-disk timestamps which are free of the year 2038 problem.
                • On-line resize; support both enlarging and shrinking the size of a mounted file system.
                from: https://nilfs.sourceforge.io/en/about_nilfs.html

                However, there are plenty of other thing it does not support, such as
                • fsck
                • Extended attributes
                from the TO DO list here: https://nilfs.sourceforge.io/en/current_status.html

                so I do not advocate it as a file system panacea.

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                • #9
                  > XFS developers are announcing that in the Year 2030 they intend to deprecate their Version Four (V4) file-system format -- thus users have a decade to upgrade to the newer V5 format

                  Is there an upgrade path though? There isn't. You can't upgrade FSF from V4 to V5 in place.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by arcivanov View Post
                    > XFS developers are announcing that in the Year 2030 they intend to deprecate their Version Four (V4) file-system format -- thus users have a decade to upgrade to the newer V5 format

                    Is there an upgrade path though? There isn't. You can't upgrade FSF from V4 to V5 in place.
                    Yes, because 10 years (and even that isn't set in stone, hence the word "intend") isn't enough to migrate......

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