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EXT4 "Fast Commits" Coming For Big Performance Boost In Ordered Mode

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  • EXT4 "Fast Commits" Coming For Big Performance Boost In Ordered Mode

    Phoronix: EXT4 "Fast Commits" Coming For Big Performance Boost In Ordered Mode

    After being in development for more than one year, it looks like with Linux 5.10 there will be EXT4 fast commit support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Commit-Queued

  • #2
    That sounds like a big performance boost, especially when taking into account that `data=ordered` is the default option of mounting ext4 filesystems. I am looking forward to a new round of Phoronix's FS benchmarks (particularly f2fs/btrfs/xfs/ext4) for linux 5.10!

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    • #3
      I noted that linux file systems generally are not efficient comparing them to how simple XP made the same operations when I used to run both it and linux operating system in dual boot. Linux operating systems have been struggled in hard drive operations and if it overtakes the whole RAM amount using swap file the slowdown becomes without any possibility the RAM comes back.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
        I noted that linux file systems generally are not efficient comparing them to how simple XP made the same operations when I used to run both it and linux operating system in dual boot. Linux operating systems have been struggled in hard drive operations and if it overtakes the whole RAM amount using swap file the slowdown becomes without any possibility the RAM comes back.
        operations / using / in / Linux / to / swap / any / I / file / and / to / whole / back. / it / both / comparing / XP / the / the / run / when / overtakes / systems / made / slowdown / hard / simple / that / struggled / / dual / possibility / without / becomes / systems / same / been / RAM / efficient / operations / system / amount / drive / have / and / them / it / linux / the / used / how / I / in / comes / if / are / boot. / RAM / file / operating / linux / generally / operating / noted / the / not

        I wanted to see if passing the above text through The Scramblinator would make it more clear, but no.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
          I noted that linux file systems generally are not efficient comparing them to how simple XP made the same operations when I used to run both it and linux operating system in dual boot. Linux operating systems have been struggled in hard drive operations and if it overtakes the whole RAM amount using swap file the slowdown becomes without any possibility the RAM comes back.
          What a freaking joke. Windows fs crawls even with Steam. Windows fs performance suck as hell.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
            I noted that linux file systems generally are not efficient comparing them to how simple XP made the same operations when I used to run both it and linux operating system in dual boot. Linux operating systems have been struggled in hard drive operations and if it overtakes the whole RAM amount using swap file the slowdown becomes without any possibility the RAM comes back.
            Linux FS or file-IO performance is generally known to be superior to Windows. Though I've never verified this myself using benchmarks, but AFAIK this is the current consensus.
            Last edited by ultimA; 09 October 2020, 04:32 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ultimA View Post

              Linux FS or file-IO performance is generally known to be superior to Windows. Though I've never verified this myself using benchmarks, but AFAIK this is the current consensus.
              Try something as simple as unzipping files, it's obvious.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by caligula View Post

                Try something as simple as unzipping files, it's obvious.
                Something with thousands of small files.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by caligula View Post

                  Try something as simple as unzipping files, it's obvious.
                  As the following links show, Linux was faster in 2013, and was generally faster in 2018. A 2019 third link shows application startup times which are usually IO-bound to be again better on Linux, and much-much better for file-copy with small files than Windows, only being somewhat worse for large files.

                  I'm not sure why unzipping on your system is noticeably slower, but there can be countless reasons: different decompressor applications, a driver issue, filesystem mount options, immature FS (like btrfs) etc. It also depends somewhat on the distribution you used for Linux, as the second link shows. If you're talking personal impressions, then mine is the opposite of yours: I always felt Linux IO is at least as fast as Windows (on my Laptop I dual boot), but this was never a methodical test. For adequate tests, see my links in the previous paragraphs.
                  Last edited by ultimA; 09 October 2020, 05:20 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ferry View Post

                    operations / using / in / Linux / to / swap / any / I / file / and / to / whole / back. / it / both / comparing / XP / the / the / run / when / overtakes / systems / made / slowdown / hard / simple / that / struggled / / dual / possibility / without / becomes / systems / same / been / RAM / efficient / operations / system / amount / drive / have / and / them / it / linux / the / used / how / I / in / comes / if / are / boot. / RAM / file / operating / linux / generally / operating / noted / the / not

                    I wanted to see if passing the above text through The Scramblinator would make it more clear, but no.
                    Some operations are faster on Windows, like deleting a file or folder with files, I heard windows just deletes the file while Linux first deletes the nodes of a file and then the file itself. But lately file deletion speed on Linux seems normal, not sure.

                    Been using Linux for 12 years, but I'd be using windows if not for its viruses.

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