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Git 2.29-rc0 Released With SHA-256 In Experimental State, Restores Protocol v2 Default

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  • #11
    Git is the best snapshot-based VCS we have, I use it daily and I love it. But it's not perfect, specially the stupid ways in which merges fail due to the system not being patch-based. I worked a lot with rebase heavy workflows, maintaining a set of patches with varying bases. That's a powerful workflow and doable in git, but not ideal, it fails with conflicts more than you would expect and that adds unnecessary maintenance burden.

    One day we'll move on from git just like we moved on from centralized VCS. My hope for the next iteration of VCS is a patch-based distributed system. Currently Pijul seems like the best fitting candidate: https://pijul.org/

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    • #12
      And, since noone has posted it yet:
      https://xkcd.com/1597/

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      • #13
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post

        I was thinking if it has gotten any more intuitive, like if I need to list tags/branches/remotes, maybe sometimes it is without parameter, maybe sometimes with -l sometimes with -L sometimes with --list. I am so confuse.
        From my experience it is not really a big deal.
        Most of the time I simplify the workflow for each project.
        It leads to a situation where for each project there are the same commands most of the time.

        I also add scripts to the PATH, which are really simple to find via tabbing in console, even if I forgot them.
        Example: search commit by message: git log --all --grep=<> vs git.commit.search.by.message <>

        I also started to create a project (as many others) that works independently of the concrete VCS:
        https://github.com/www-splitcells-ne...main/bash/repo

        Not that I have much experience, but the only real problem is that git cannot be used by non developers, imo.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by jntesteves View Post
          And, since noone has posted it yet:
          https://xkcd.com/1597/

          I remember actually doing this when I was experimenting with Linux compiling back in 2013 or 2014.

          Just clone a software that doesn't exist in my distro, and type some commands to compile it.

          If I get errors, just save my project, format the Linux installation, reinstall and try again.

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