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Red Hat's Stratis 2.2 Linux Storage Solution Released

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  • #11
    Originally posted by cjcox View Post
    Anyone who's anyone that follows anything that Red Hat does know why they want a Red Hat "owned" solution. Is this really a surprise to anyone?
    as anyone with brains knows they want a red hat "supportable" solution. when you don't have btrfs devs, but you have python devs, all you can support is subj

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    • #12
      Originally posted by R41N3R View Post
      So the only reason is an alternative :-)
      the only reason is lack of in-house expertise

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      • #13
        Originally posted by mortn View Post
        Want a distributed, extensively configurable, self-healing, copy-on-write storage system? Use Ceph. Been managing both large scale clusters and single node setups for years. Can recommend.
        ceph is a completly different animal than zfs, btrfs, stratis etc. Why are you bringing this up here?

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        • #14
          My point is exactly that Ceph is just as much a storage solution as btrfs, stratis or zfs.
          It’s not like Ceph(FS) is so overly complex that we can't bring it up here or you need a degree to set it up. It's not a different animal. It's another animal.
          We don't need to agree whether Ceph is in or out of context here though.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by pal666 View Post
            as anyone with brains knows they want a red hat "supportable" solution. when you don't have btrfs devs, but you have python devs, all you can support is subj
            Alternatively, brfs has been in development for God knows how many years and have yet to mature to anything resembles enterprise quality FS (let alone a managed storage solution), and RedHat being the biggest enterprise focused Linux distribution has decided to take existing enterprise quality building blocks, such as XFS and LVM, and use them to develop an advance storage solution.

            You may not like it, but somehow I doubt that RedHat, with its 3.5B USD revenue , will care...
            Devel: Intel S2600C0, 2xE5-2658V2, 32GB, 6x2TB, 1x256GB-SSD, GTX1080, F32, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
            oVirt: Intel S2400GP2, 2xE5-2448L, 96GB, 10x2TB, GTX550, CentOS8.1.
            Win10: Gigabyte B85M-HD3, E3-1245V3, 32GB, 5x1TB, GTX980, Win10Pro.
            Devel-2: Asus H110M-K, i5-6500, 16GB, 3x1TB + 128GB-SSD, F32, Dell U2711.
            Laptop: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F32.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by gilboa View Post
              Alternatively, brfs has been in development for God knows how many years and have yet to mature to anything resembles enterprise quality FS
              yes, alternatively. as in "in alternative universe". in our universe it's default fs for suse enterprise distro. stratis is in development for more than 4 years already, btw. 4 years ago btrfs was just 8 years old. you don't have to be a god to know that
              Originally posted by gilboa View Post
              (let alone a managed storage solution), and RedHat being the biggest enterprise focused Linux distribution has decided to take existing enterprise quality building blocks, such as XFS and LVM, and use them to develop an advance storage solution.
              redhat as the only enterprise focused linux distro not employing btrfs devs has decided to use available python programmers to write some scripts on top of their legacy tech
              Originally posted by gilboa View Post
              You may not like it, but somehow I doubt that RedHat, with its 3.5B USD revenue , will care...
              what you are trying to say? do you like every product of microsoft(which has much larger revenue)?
              Last edited by pal666; 13 October 2020, 11:55 PM.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                yes, alternatively. as in "in alternative universe". in our universe it's default fs for suse enterprise distro. stratis is in development for more than 4 years already, btw. 4 years ago btrfs was just 8 years old. you don't have to be a god to know that
                And the point being?
                Does any of this makes BTRFS, as a storage solution, stable?
                Does any of this makes RedHat decision less viable _to_ RedHat customers?

                redhat as the only enterprise focused linux distro not employing btrfs devs has decided to use available python programmers to write some scripts on top of their legacy tech
                1. You say legacy. I say technology that drivers IT operation worth 100's of billions of USD (And God knows how many ZB of data).
                2. I would imagine that if RedHat wanted BTFS developers in house, they'd have a team up and running in 90 days. Possibly less. Do assume that RedHat is not stupid (as you seem to suggest) and simply has other considerations you either don't understand or don't want to understand.

                - Gilboa
                Devel: Intel S2600C0, 2xE5-2658V2, 32GB, 6x2TB, 1x256GB-SSD, GTX1080, F32, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
                oVirt: Intel S2400GP2, 2xE5-2448L, 96GB, 10x2TB, GTX550, CentOS8.1.
                Win10: Gigabyte B85M-HD3, E3-1245V3, 32GB, 5x1TB, GTX980, Win10Pro.
                Devel-2: Asus H110M-K, i5-6500, 16GB, 3x1TB + 128GB-SSD, F32, Dell U2711.
                Laptop: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F32.

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