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Linux 5.9 Likely To See USB4 Support Improvements

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  • Linux 5.9 Likely To See USB4 Support Improvements

    Phoronix: Linux 5.9 Likely To See USB4 Support Improvements

    Linux 5.6 brought initial USB4 support that primarily was starting things off by basing things off the existing Thunderbolt 3 support in the kernel for which this latest USB standard is based. For the Linux 5.9 kernel later this summer it's looking like there will be further work on getting Linux's USB4 support into good shape ahead of hardware appearing in the months ahead...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...4-Improvements

  • #2
    One of my friends was having issues with an external hard disk, it's a Thunderbolt 3 device which uses a USB-C connector. For some reason it's not backwards compatible, so even through it plugs in an enumerates something, it can't be used as a hard disk. Is this device unique, or are all Thunderbolt devices not backwards compatible with USB 3? Seems like they could have allowed it to run at USB 3 speeds

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
      One of my friends was having issues with an external hard disk, it's a Thunderbolt 3 device which uses a USB-C connector. For some reason it's not backwards compatible, so even through it plugs in an enumerates something, it can't be used as a hard disk. Is this device unique, or are all Thunderbolt devices not backwards compatible with USB 3? Seems like they could have allowed it to run at USB 3 speeds
      Technically speaking, it's not an evolution of USB, so "backwards-compatible with USB 3.0" is like saying "backwards-compatible with Firewire".

      That said, newer Thunderbolt 3 device controllers (the ones inside the hard drive) and obviously USB4 ones can just act as a USB 3.0 device too, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunde...#Thunderbolt_3

      On 8 January 2018, Intel announced a product refresh (codenamed Titan Ridge) with "enhanced robustness" and support for DisplayPort 1.4. The new peripheral controller can now act as a USB sink (compatible with regular USB-C ports).[65]
      Intel offers a single port (JHL7340) and double port (JHL7540) version of this host controller and a peripheral controller supporting two Thunderbolt 3 ports (JHL7440).


      so it seems your device has an older controller than 2018, or there might be other issues, who knows.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
        One of my friends was having issues with an external hard disk, it's a Thunderbolt 3 device which uses a USB-C connector. For some reason it's not backwards compatible, so even through it plugs in an enumerates something, it can't be used as a hard disk. Is this device unique, or are all Thunderbolt devices not backwards compatible with USB 3? Seems like they could have allowed it to run at USB 3 speeds
        Looks like its a confusing one. Your friend should know if the motherboard or store bought pc offers thunderbolt on that USB port of the computer.

        "In practice, this means that a USB-C port may have Thunderbolt 3 capabilities, or it may have only USB 3.2 Gen 2 capabilities. Computer brands are very quick to point out if Thunderbolt 3 is included on a port, so this is usually easy to tell."
        https://www.digitaltrends.com/comput...it-do-for-pcs/

        Also appears that it could be possible that the port has a lower USB version than the required one for the external hard disk over thunderbolt 3 as well.

        I would say to verify that the port being used on the computer has thunderbolt or if only one or two specific other ports do. If it has it and its a compatible version with the hard drive then there's another problem.

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