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WireGuard 1.0.0 Christened As A Modern Secure VPN Alternative To OpenVPN/IPsec

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  • #11
    Originally posted by birdie View Post
    VPN providers which support WireGuard: https://greycoder.com/a-list-of-wire...-vpns-in-2019/ I haven't tested any - since I'm extremely lazy I will wait until NetworkManager supports it natively in GUI. Right now it's all a bit tedious and requires using the console: https://blogs.gnome.org/thaller/2019...etworkmanager/
    Private Internet Access has wireguard support in beta..

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    • #12
      Originally posted by birdie View Post
      VPN providers which support WireGuard: https://greycoder.com/a-list-of-wire...-vpns-in-2019/ I haven't tested any - since I'm extremely lazy I will wait until NetworkManager supports it natively in GUI. Right now it's all a bit tedious and requires using the console: https://blogs.gnome.org/thaller/2019...etworkmanager/
      VPN providers often have their own apps.
      Mullwad supports WireGuard and provides an open source app for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iOS

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      • #13
        Originally posted by staggerlee View Post

        Private Internet Access has wireguard support in beta..
        https://vpnpro.com/blog/vpn-provider...sitors-online/

        Number of trackers:

        PIA: 4
        Mullvad: 0
        Protonvpn: 0
        Nordvpn: 10

        Sure they're not classed as 'risky trackers' like some, but I'd rather not have any personally.

        Very excited to see wireguard take off widespread, but I would be extremely cautious about the provider you choose (if indeed you choose one).

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        • #14
          Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
          VPN providers often have their own apps.
          Mullwad supports WireGuard and provides an open source app for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iOS
          decent VPN providers usually give you plain configuration or even a file to connect without the app, as that's what you usually do for a router, or if your distro isn't Ubuntu LTS.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            decent VPN providers usually give you plain configuration or even a file to connect without the app, as that's what you usually do for a router, or if your distro isn't Ubuntu LTS.
            Right, Mullvad also provides config files for OpenVPN and WireGuard, plus installation guides for standard VPN clients.
            Custom apps are useful for beginners (and maybe all Windowsians, since, with my personal VPN, I never managed to have OpenVPN working correctly on Windows, or even MS's own PPTP client !) and can be more practical, for example with server switching. There is also the killswitch function, even through I personally prefer, on Linux, a namespace isolation (harder to set up). When this app is proprietary, it can be an issue, but it's fine with an open source app.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by ALRBP View Post
              Custom apps are useful for beginners
              I'm not saying they aren't useful, I'm saying they commonly break outside of Ubuntu, and in many cases they are bundling their own stuff and not using the system's binaries for important libs and applications like OpenVPN or libssl.

              Also yes, basic stuff like killswitch still isn't implemented natively in NetworkManager (it's a simple firewalling trick, I have added scripts to do it, but really I shouldn't be doing that) and it's outrageous.

              My router (with OpenWrt, but also GL.inet routers) can be fed a openvpn config file and configured to killswitch OpenVPN or even Wireguard with a couple clicks.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by ALRBP View Post

                Right, Mullvad also provides config files for OpenVPN and WireGuard, plus installation guides for standard VPN clients.
                Custom apps are useful for beginners (and maybe all Windowsians, since, with my personal VPN, I never managed to have OpenVPN working correctly on Windows, or even MS's own PPTP client !) and can be more practical, for example with server switching. There is also the killswitch function, even through I personally prefer, on Linux, a namespace isolation (harder to set up). When this app is proprietary, it can be an issue, but it's fine with an open source app.
                Not to mention that Mullvad also employs some of the most security conscious people that I've ever seen. The lengths that they go to make sure that none of their machines are compromised are way more than any enterprise security department ever would.

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                • #18
                  I'd say compared to ipsec, pptp and openvpn it quite an improvement, any day. Simple, unobtrusive, works. Without tons of enterprise-grade bugged crap and stupid buzzwords. And it simple enough so everyone can be their own "provider" setting that up on their server themselves, etc. Its nowhere close to horrors of setting up ipsec or even getting openvpn anyhow secure.

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