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Systemd 245 RC2 Released With Systemd-Homed, Partitioner + More

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  • Systemd 245 RC2 Released With Systemd-Homed, Partitioner + More

    Phoronix: Systemd 245 RC2 Released With Systemd-Homed, Partitioner + More

    Released one month ago was systemd 245 RC1 while now a second release candidate is available. Systemd 245 stable should be shipping in the near future as well in order to make some of the spring Linux distribution releases like Fedora 32...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ystemd-245-rc2

  • #2
    Seems like a fairly major release. Gonna be interesting when everything available starts being implemented at the distribution level.

    Minor nitpick -- I wish they'd go the busybox route and have a systemd executable that gets symlinked into all the *ctl commands.

    systemd list-tools
    *list of tools*
    systemd timedate help
    systemd system enable --user gamemode.service

    I just think that would be easier to work with over having to remember every single "function+ctl" while still leaving all the "function+ctl's" around for tools/scripts that are used to the current method. Especially long-term as systemd picks up more and more functionality.

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    • #3
      Too complicated...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
        Seems like a fairly major release. Gonna be interesting when everything available starts being implemented at the distribution level.

        Minor nitpick -- I wish they'd go the busybox route and have a systemd executable that gets symlinked into all the *ctl commands.

        systemd list-tools
        *list of tools*
        systemd timedate help
        systemd system enable --user gamemode.service

        I just think that would be easier to work with over having to remember every single "function+ctl" while still leaving all the "function+ctl's" around for tools/scripts that are used to the current method. Especially long-term as systemd picks up more and more functionality.
        People already complain about systemd being a collection of utilities, can you imagine if it all became a single binary? It would be World War 3.

        It's probably safer and more secure to keep them separate and it reduces the complexity.
        Last edited by Britoid; 03-03-2020, 09:14 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Britoid View Post

          People already complain about systemd being a collection of utilities, can you imagine if it all became a single binary? It would be World War 3.

          It's probably safer and more secure to keep them separate and it reduces the complexity.
          Fuck those people. They can use Devuan or Void and deal with their collection of utilities.

          The rest of us in the real world want a cohesive and easy to use system to manage our system. Having to "ls /usr/bin/*ctl" to find out what is available sucks ass and is neither cohesive nor easy to use because KDE stuff like balooctl shows up.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

            Fuck those people. They can use Devuan or Void and deal with their collection of utilities.

            The rest of us in the real world want a cohesive and easy to use system to manage our system. Having to "ls /usr/bin/*ctl" to find out what is available sucks ass and is neither cohesive nor easy to use because KDE stuff like balooctl shows up.
            But you're going to know what's available at systemd <command> ? Then you're going to have confusion between what ctls are from systemd and what aren't.

            I agree that those people should go and use Devuan and Void and stop complaining though. systemd isn't going anywhere or being replaced anytime soon.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Britoid View Post

              But you're going to know what's available at systemd <command> ? Then you're going to have confusion between what ctls are from systemd and what aren't.

              I agree that those people should go and use Devuan and Void and stop complaining though. systemd isn't going anywhere or being replaced anytime soon.
              That's the current problem. Here's the *ctl's on my current system:

              Code:
              /usr/bin/akonadictl /usr/bin/busctl /usr/bin/hostnamectl /usr/bin/loginctl /usr/bin/pactl /usr/bin/systemctl /usr/bin/wdctl
              /usr/bin/balooctl /usr/bin/coredumpctl /usr/bin/journalctl /usr/bin/machinectl /usr/bin/panelctl /usr/bin/teamdctl
              /usr/bin/bluetoothctl /usr/bin/evmctl /usr/bin/keyctl /usr/bin/ndctl /usr/bin/portablectl /usr/bin/timedatectl
              /usr/bin/bootctl /usr/bin/flatpak-coredumpctl /usr/bin/localectl /usr/bin/networkctl /usr/bin/resolvectl /usr/bin/udisksctl
              Being able to "systemd <TAB>" or "systemctl list-systemd-commands" or whatever to tell me what all systemd management programs are available would be handy. Doing something BusyBox style makes the most sense.

              It's the downside to the "'everything' in systemd can be used together or alone" philosophy.

              After a certain point systemd needs a unifying tool because it's becoming just as cumbersome and clusterfucky as it was when we had the 402 different system management tools that systemd was/is designed to replace.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                That's the current problem. Here's the *ctl's on my current system:

                Code:
                /usr/bin/akonadictl /usr/bin/busctl /usr/bin/hostnamectl /usr/bin/loginctl /usr/bin/pactl /usr/bin/systemctl /usr/bin/wdctl
                /usr/bin/balooctl /usr/bin/coredumpctl /usr/bin/journalctl /usr/bin/machinectl /usr/bin/panelctl /usr/bin/teamdctl
                /usr/bin/bluetoothctl /usr/bin/evmctl /usr/bin/keyctl /usr/bin/ndctl /usr/bin/portablectl /usr/bin/timedatectl
                /usr/bin/bootctl /usr/bin/flatpak-coredumpctl /usr/bin/localectl /usr/bin/networkctl /usr/bin/resolvectl /usr/bin/udisksctl
                Being able to "systemd <TAB>" or "systemctl list-systemd-commands" or whatever to tell me what all systemd management programs are available would be handy. Doing something BusyBox style makes the most sense.

                It's the downside to the "'everything' in systemd can be used together or alone" philosophy.

                After a certain point systemd needs a unifying tool because it's becoming just as cumbersome and clusterfucky as it was when we had the 402 different system management tools that systemd was/is designed to replace.
                You forgot the ones in sbin

                # find /usr/bin/*ctl /usr/sbin/*ctl
                /usr/bin/bluetoothctl
                /usr/bin/boltctl
                /usr/bin/bootctl
                /usr/bin/busctl
                /usr/bin/coredumpctl
                /usr/bin/evmctl
                /usr/bin/flatpak-coredumpctl
                /usr/bin/hostnamectl
                /usr/bin/journalctl
                /usr/bin/keyctl
                /usr/bin/localectl
                /usr/bin/loginctl
                /usr/bin/machinectl
                /usr/bin/networkctl
                /usr/bin/pactl
                /usr/bin/panelctl
                /usr/bin/portablectl
                /usr/bin/resolvectl
                /usr/bin/systemctl
                /usr/bin/timedatectl
                /usr/bin/udisksctl
                /usr/bin/wdctl
                /usr/sbin/alsactl
                /usr/sbin/apachectl
                /usr/sbin/auditctl
                /usr/sbin/brctl
                /usr/sbin/cupsctl
                /usr/sbin/rtkitctl
                /usr/sbin/sysctl
                /usr/sbin/zramctl

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Britoid View Post

                  You forgot the ones in sbin
                  Exactly.

                  /usr/sbin/apachectl
                  You're supposed to use containers

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                    Fuck those people.
                    Mr 420, eh? I'm starting to wonder how many of the pro systemd people are lefties... All of them? Indeed, I am happy to use a non-systemd distro and watch from the side lines as you all try to fabricate your utopia. Let's move the systemd HQ to San Francisco and perhaps make sure more systemd devs are non-binary: as long as systemd itself is binary!


                    Comment

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