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EXT4 In Linux 5.6 To See Big Write Performance Boost For Direct I/O

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  • phuclv
    replied
    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post

    Yes, I've tested Lubuntu and 4 zram strings appears. Do you think that zram is useful when 8GB of RAM are present?
    yes, just like why you still need a swap file/partition even though you have plenty of RAM. But zram is much better in that when you aren't low on memory, it consumes almost zero memory, whereas with a swap file/partition you lose GBs of disk space forever. zram only actually uses memory when pages are stored into it

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    Originally posted by phuclv View Post

    it should show zram devices like /dev/zram0 /dev/zram1...
    Yes, I've tested Lubuntu and 4 zram strings appears. Do you think that zram is useful when 8GB of RAM are present?

    Leave a comment:


  • phuclv
    replied
    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post

    many thanks, it shows swap file
    it should show zram devices like /dev/zram0 /dev/zram1...

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    Originally posted by phuclv View Post

    you can check if zram is being used by running cat /proc/swaps
    many thanks, it shows swap file

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  • phuclv
    replied
    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post

    many thanks. Lubuntu is an excellent operating system.
    you can check if zram is being used by running cat /proc/swaps

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    Originally posted by phuclv View Post

    On Ubuntu just run sudo apt-get install zram-config, it'll handle the setup and priority things for you
    On Lubuntu and likely a few other distros it's enabled by default, no config needed. On others you need to use a different package, or config zram manually with zramctl command. Read the kernel's documentation for more info. You may want to change the default lzo compression algorithm to lz4 for even better performance. See the benchmark on the lz4 repo

    See also Running out of RAM in Ubuntu? Enable ZRAM

    Windows and macOS have similar compression techniques by default before swapping out unused pages to disk
    many thanks. Lubuntu is an excellent operating system.

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  • phuclv
    replied
    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post

    many thanks how to use zram?
    On Ubuntu just run sudo apt-get install zram-config, it'll handle the setup and priority things for you
    On Lubuntu and likely a few other distros it's enabled by default, no config needed. On others you need to use a different package, or config zram manually with zramctl command. Read the kernel's documentation for more info. You may want to change the default lzo compression algorithm to lz4 for even better performance. See the benchmark on the lz4 repo

    See also Running out of RAM in Ubuntu? Enable ZRAM

    Windows and macOS have similar compression techniques by default before swapping out unused pages to disk
    Last edited by phuclv; 15 January 2020, 09:19 AM.

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  • Azrael5
    replied
    Originally posted by phuclv View Post

    which task requires you to view 200 tabs at once? I bet there are many unnecessary tabs that you can close. Some tabs can be delayed load and some others can be removed from memory temporarily. AFAIK newer Chrome versions automatically unload many tabs from memory, and Firefox will delay load tabs from the previous session

    But the first suggestion is to use zram (which is far faster than normal swap) and lower the priority of the swap partition
    many thanks how to use zram?

    Leave a comment:


  • coder
    replied
    Originally posted by timofonic View Post
    So what about the bcachefs promise?
    I'm not familiar with it.

    If you can find some recent benchmarks that prove me wrong, I'd be glad to hear about it.

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  • timofonic
    replied
    Originally posted by coder View Post
    XFS, for many use cases.


    Not possible. Many features of ZFS and BTRFS depend on copy-on-write, which carries performance penalties, in certain cases. Yes, you can disable CoW, but not without losing features.
    So what about the bcachefs promise?

    Leave a comment:

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