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One Of The Reasons Why Linux 5.5 Can Be Running Slower

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  • jason.oliveira
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    Sadly, most do not, at least for showing support to make future tests possible.

    Greater than 50% ad block rates.
    Less than 1% being premium subscribers.
    Less than 1% tipping.
    Start Accepting BAT from Brave users like me, damnit. I've been donating constantly through it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buntolo
    replied
    Great article, keep going on like this!

    Michael I do not have any adblock installed, but various times I see empty ads in the page. How do I check if there's any Firefox setting blocking your ads?

    Leave a comment:


  • splitcells.net
    replied
    Originally posted by nils_ View Post

    Right now there is no blocking in most countries though that may be one of the hidden motives behind GDPR.
    As an European I can tell you, that the advertisment on this site is not illegal in the EU.
    Just compare the ads of European news sites and you will know it.

    > It's not as if he needs more than show you EULA and privacy policy that non-premium users must accept to continue using the site and this stops being a problem.

    The site already does that.
    Just open it in private mode.

    Leave a comment:


  • nils_
    replied
    Originally posted by stiiixy View Post

    Some guy informing Michael that his site's quite likely illegal in the EU (he might find himself blocked if it is the case, and enforced) is an opportunity for some bravado!
    Right now there is no blocking in most countries though that may be one of the hidden motives behind GDPR.

    Leave a comment:


  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by stiiixy View Post

    Some guy informing Michael that his site's quite likely illegal in the EU (he might find himself blocked if it is the case, and enforced) is an opportunity for some bravado!
    It's not as if he needs more than show you EULA and privacy policy that non-premium users must accept to continue using the site and this stops being a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • splitcells.net
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    Sadly, most do not, at least for showing support to make future tests possible.

    Greater than 50% ad block rates.
    Less than 1% being premium subscribers.
    Less than 1% tipping.
    Just my 5 cents.
    I have recently bought a subscription, because of your excellent services.
    Like others have said, it is a bit hard to find, that you can buy a subscription.
    Yes, sometimes some articles are advertising the premium subscription, but most of the time there is no clearly visible hint of it.

    There is also no special color for premium subscriptions and the only default reference to it, seems to be at the bottom of the website.
    Nicely hidden.
    (I just skimmed the website again. Maybe I missed something, but this is the point.)

    One does not have to use animations etc. in order to advertise the premium subscription.
    A orange/yellow button with "Support" or "ad free" written on the top, may even be enough.


    On the other hand, it is quite normal that less than 1-2% are paying.

    Leave a comment:


  • Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by JanC View Post
    Problem there is that that link is most likely removed by tracker blockers, because Paypal is one of those scummy privacy-invading companies people try to keep out of their life as much as possibleā€¦
    Indeed. When Bountysource changed hands, the new owners decided to pay bounties only by Paypal. As I am not willing under any circumstances to make a Paypal account, I had to refund a bounty I had already earned back to the poster and stop accepting any further bounties via them. I take keeping the whole Google/Facebook/Twitter/Amazon/Paypal axis out of my life quite seriously, and even though I am not employed still let those bounties go.

    Leave a comment:


  • xorbe
    replied
    LWN does it better by not requiring signing up for a forced recurring subscription. A couple weeks before expiration they show reminders, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    EU law doesn't apply on this side of the pond! Internet FTW.
    Don't really know why but this is the first time I realised that Michael was American, I've always seen him as either German or Belgian (must be his love for Beer that made me believe that).

    Don't really understand why you cheer that you are not subject to pro-privacy legislation?! (And I say that as an EU citizen that browses on Phoronix with ad-blocker disabled).

    Leave a comment:


  • F.Ultra
    replied
    Originally posted by NotMine999 View Post

    The LK developer crowd has always impressed as "typical programmers".

    They don't write very good documentation ... when they write documentation.

    They don't perform useful regression testing on their work ... when they should ... as many rely on volunteers (3rd parties) to test the code to dubious standards.

    I guess these genius LK developers can't be bothered to conjure some test rigs for their code, though I have heard a few of them might have 1 or 2 rigs for testing that they timeshare with other tasks. Perhaps these LK developers are waiting for hardware donations or the price of RAM to drop.

    I still say the Linux Foundation should send a grant to Michael & Phoronix, or provide a yearly stipend to help offset the costs of his work in exchange for a set amount of testing. Better yet, perhaps the Linux Foundation should fund an effort by Michael to develop some testing platforms for the use of LK developers to judge the impact of their patches & features.
    There are numerous regression tests being run on the Linux kernel. The CKI project (https://opensource.com/article/19/6/...egration-linux) alone runs over 100.000 kernel test runs each month. And then there is LTP (https://linux-test-project.github.io/) and also various distributions perform their own set of regression testing.

    The problem with this one is explained by Michael in the article itself, AppArmor is not used by many outside of Ubuntu. Also 5.5 is not released, it's still in development and no actual distribution is going to use the vanilla version of it anyway.

    A second problem is that the vast majority of the regression testing is done for correctness and not performance (not to mention that decrease in performance for one type of load on one type of system could be an increase in performance for a different kind of load on a different kind of system).

    Leave a comment:

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