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Systemd-homed Looks Like It Will Merged Soon For systemd 245

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  • #61
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    All workstations have always been Windows or some random thin client where the OS does not matter.
    That's an odd claim. For example, Sun were used for "client server computing" for a long time. Sun Workstations (like my Sun 3/60 and SPARCClassic) were workstations running SunOS and Solaris. Many competing UNIX vendors produced workstations.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by Hugh View Post
      That's an odd claim.
      It's taken out of context.
      It's context is
      I never seen anything "unix" using something like AD, they all retreated to mainframes and eventually disappeared. All workstations have always been Windows or some random thin client where the OS does not matter.

      This is my own personal experience, and yes I never saw any meaningful use of Unix workstations before Unix disappeared completely. I don't live in the US, so what was common there is definitely not common outside of it.

      Which is what made me ask what is an "Unix enterprise client" in the first place. And that guy still didn't answer me. MacOS isn't a "Unix enterprise client" any more than Linux or Windows are. Is there any difference with a modern AD-like (or kerberos+LDAP) setup?
      Last edited by starshipeleven; 12-08-2019, 11:13 AM.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Hugh View Post

        That's an odd claim. For example, Sun were used for "client server computing" for a long time. Sun Workstations (like my Sun 3/60 and SPARCClassic) were workstations running SunOS and Solaris. Many competing UNIX vendors produced workstations.
        This is exactly right. The Unix model how it differed is it's much more like the mainframe model. The data was generally at rest server side via NFS. I worked at AT&T in the 90's and we had Sun workstations. (If you've ever wondered who kept/keeps Unix alive look no further than AT&T and friends.. they don't really announce it tho). Authentication over just LDAP right? well sometimes.. sometimes it was NIS, and there were a few other products out there as I mentioned, even passwd with cfengine. At the time it wasn't really that uncommon. It was Microsoft that moved work data to the local hard disk with Win98/Win2000. It's ironic that most of that data is moving back server side like the old mainframes now. And that is the real difference generally. It's where the data is at rest.. Yes, you can do server side in Windows but few ppl do, SMB/CIFS is kind of a messy protocol to do this on.

        So when you understand that and look at homed.. (you got homed!) Is this really doing the right thing? I tend to be a fan of looking at client systems as being trivial. They are a OS, that runs a web browser, (a graphical terminal really) a mail client and a chat app. Then you view them like that.. the client OS can be whatever you want. Windows, mac, linux, android.. whatever.. your IT department doesn't care what they are so long as they can run the endpoint security.

        Now... maybe it has to do with the modern CPU being so much faster in relation to the rest of the system.. but the network can still be faster than the disk.. and protecting IP is a greater challenge when data is local.
        Last edited by k1e0x; 12-10-2019, 09:44 PM.

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