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EXT4 For Linux 5.5 Sees New Improvements For This Mature File-System

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  • EXT4 For Linux 5.5 Sees New Improvements For This Mature File-System

    Phoronix: EXT4 For Linux 5.5 Sees New Improvements For This Mature File-System

    While EXT4 is the most common Linux file-system among distributions and is quite mature at this stage, it does continue seeing noteworthy improvements every so often with new kernel releases. With Linux 5.5 there are more notable improvements on deck...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...5-Improvements

  • #2
    "Mature" is a synonym for "out dated" ?

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    • #3
      ext4 is bullet-proof. Choose this if you don't know anything about filesystems and don't care. Everything works with ext4, no breakage, no sht happening. Even if your disk gets some bad blocks, you are probably going to recover all your data from ext4, all you need is another disk with the same capacity.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by silviumc View Post
        ext4 is bullet-proof. Choose this if you don't know anything about filesystems and don't care. Everything works with ext4, no breakage, no sht happening. Even if your disk gets some bad blocks, you are probably going to recover all your data from ext4, all you need is another disk with the same capacity.
        Sure. Except on Linux 4.19 when with blk-mq basically ext4 corrupted itself.

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        • #5
          I've started moving all my installations over from ext4 to xfs.

          It's slightly faster and is starting to support CoW. I've never been in the position where I need to shrink filesystems so that disadvantage doesn't bother me.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by silviumc View Post
            ext4 is bullet-proof. Choose this if you don't know anything about filesystems and don't care. Everything works with ext4, no breakage, no sht happening. Even if your disk gets some bad blocks, you are probably going to recover all your data from ext4, all you need is another disk with the same capacity.
            I left ext 4 and choose zfs due to a lot of read/write errors. With Ubuntu 19.10 supporting zfs, it a best thing ever happened to me. Now the laptop is in piece, meditating. No error, no bad block message, etc.

            This doesn't mean I don't support ext 4. I just telling what I have experienced while I was using Ubuntu 19.04 with ext 4 VS Ubuntu 19.10 with zfs.

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            • #7
              What I really need is a file-system for bit rot detection for my enormous amount of multimedia data spread across multiple disks of differing sizes, as I simply use mergerfs for volume management because it's far more versatile and easy to use than anything else I've tried. However btrfs is too unstable, and I've never found a way to put zfs on a single disk. I tried it a few times but always ended up running out of time and surrendering and just using ext4 again.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                What I really need is a file-system for bit rot detection for my enormous amount of multimedia data spread across multiple disks of differing sizes, as I simply use mergerfs for volume management because it's far more versatile and easy to use than anything else I've tried. However btrfs is too unstable, and I've never found a way to put zfs on a single disk. I tried it a few times but always ended up running out of time and surrendering and just using ext4 again.
                I think you are looking for something like SnapRAID. http://www.snapraid.it/compare

                I haven’t used it personally (I use FeeeNAS with ZFS on my main NAS), but am considering it - in combination with MergerFS - for a stand alone media server NAS (specifically because of the flexibility with mixing and adding drives).

                Here’s a guide to a system build - with MergerFS and SnapRAID - here:
                http://blog.linuxserver.io/2016/02/0...a-server-2016/

                and a follow up here:
                http://blog.linuxserver.io/2017/06/2...a-server-2017/

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