Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Linux 5.5 To Finally Expose NVMe Drive Temperatures Via HWMON

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Linux 5.5 To Finally Expose NVMe Drive Temperatures Via HWMON

    Phoronix: Linux 5.5 To Finally Expose NVMe Drive Temperatures Via HWMON

    Linux for years has supported monitoring NVMe drive temperatures when installing the nvme user-space utility and run as root, etc. But now finally with Linux 5.5 the kernel is supporting NVMe drive temperature reporting through the hardware monitoring "HWMON" infrastructure alongside other hardware sensors...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-HWMON-Support

  • #2
    Finally! I had to use nvme-cli to read that.

    Comment


    • #3
      I just applied the patches to my Manjaro 5.4.0-rc8 kernel build and it works!

      I didn't even have to rescan, after reboot there was simply a new sensor named nvme-pci-0100 reading the correct temperature under the label "Composite." So I just changed the name in Psensor and now I can finally monitor all my disk temperatures again.

      Now if AMD could just fix the the fan control/RPM sensor issues with my R9-390 all my hardware issues would be solved for now. I actually had to use a service I found in a Wiki, with a few slight modifications, to manually monitor my GPU temp every second and control its fans, which is kind of crazy. But if I didn't do it my GPU would start melting when I tried to play a game.

      Comment


      • #4
        I could never understand the broken logic of Linux where you would need a utility to run as root to read the sensors.
        I'm glad that some developers want to bring some sanity into this madness.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
          I could never understand the broken logic of Linux where you would need a utility to run as root to read the sensors.
          I'm glad that some developers want to bring some sanity into this madness.
          I can, but only to prevent certain hardware from doing unexpected behavior...like a remote user logging on and checking CD/DVD drive speeds before configuring a program to write a backup disk, but a few minutes earlier the sys-admin got tired of waiting on Joe to log in and do is damn job so he used that dive to burn the backup disk and the two commands clash leaving the disk burnt with some errors.

          Hey Joe, that was our last disk so you're not working remote today and you need to pick up a 100 pack of DVD-Rs on the way in. I'll reimburse you when you get here.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
            I could never understand the broken logic of Linux where you would need a utility to run as root to read the sensors.
            I'm glad that some developers want to bring some sanity into this madness.
            If it's not exposed in proper, hwmon way, then probably you need to query some lower level stuff. Hence the need for root access.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
              I could never understand the broken logic of Linux where you would need a utility to run as root to read the sensors.
              I'm glad that some developers want to bring some sanity into this madness.
              Broken logic of the NVMe module you mean?
              Because for pretty much everything else you don't need root to read sensors.

              Code:
              [email protected]:~> sensors
              nct6779-isa-0290
              Adapter: ISA adapter
              Vcore:                  +0.59 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +1.74 V)
              in1:                    +0.27 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              AVCC:                   +3.42 V  (min =  +2.98 V, max =  +3.63 V)
              +3.3V:                  +3.42 V  (min =  +2.98 V, max =  +3.63 V)
              in4:                    +1.88 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              in5:                    +0.99 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              in6:                    +0.28 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              3VSB:                   +3.49 V  (min =  +2.98 V, max =  +3.63 V)
              Vbat:                   +3.30 V  (min =  +2.70 V, max =  +3.63 V)
              in9:                    +0.00 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)
              in10:                   +0.22 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              in11:                   +1.04 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              in12:                   +1.70 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              in13:                   +1.04 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              in14:                   +1.82 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)  ALARM
              fan1:                     0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
              fan2:                  1439 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
              fan3:                     0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
              fan4:                     0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
              fan5:                     0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM)
              SYSTIN:                 +30.0°C  (high =  +0.0°C, hyst =  +0.0°C)  ALARM  sensor = thermistor
              CPUTIN:                 +30.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, hyst = +75.0°C)  sensor = thermistor
              AUXTIN0:                +93.5°C    sensor = thermistor
              AUXTIN1:               +100.0°C    sensor = thermistor
              AUXTIN2:                +24.0°C    sensor = thermistor
              AUXTIN3:                -24.0°C    sensor = thermistor
              SMBUSMASTER 0:          +29.0°C 
              PCH_CHIP_CPU_MAX_TEMP:   +0.0°C 
              PCH_CHIP_TEMP:           +0.0°C 
              PCH_CPU_TEMP:            +0.0°C 
              intrusion0:            OK
              intrusion1:            ALARM
              beep_enable:           disabled
              
              amdgpu-pci-0600
              Adapter: PCI adapter
              vddgfx:           N/A 
              vddnb:            N/A 
              edge:         +29.0°C  (crit = +80.0°C, hyst =  +0.0°C)
              
              k10temp-pci-00c3
              Adapter: PCI adapter
              Tdie:         +29.1°C  (high = +70.0°C)
              Tctl:         +29.1°C

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                I can, but only to prevent certain hardware from doing unexpected behavior
                It was just not hooked up to hwmon interface, there is no reason to wall off sensor readings.

                Comment

                Working...
                X