Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

NFS Changes On Linux 5.3 Will Allow Clients To Use New "nconnect" Mount Option

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • NFS Changes On Linux 5.3 Will Allow Clients To Use New "nconnect" Mount Option

    Phoronix: NFS Changes On Linux 5.3 Will Allow Clients To Use New "nconnect" Mount Option

    Sent out on Thursday were the NFS client updates for the Linux 5.3 kernel merge window. This time around are a few interesting changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag....3-NFS-Changes

  • #2
    Is anyone still actually using NFS?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jacob View Post
      Is anyone still actually using NFS?
      Who isn't using NFS? What is the alternative?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by johnc View Post

        Who isn't using NFS?
        Probably no-one is using NFS unless they wish to have insecure, statically configured file sharing exclusively between *nix and/or Linux systems? I would guesstimate that at 99.99999999999% of the world's computer users.

        Originally posted by johnc View Post
        What is the alternative?
        For home/corporate networks, SMB and/or WebDav.
        For large data centres, something like Gluster.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by jacob View Post
          Is anyone still actually using NFS?
          Yes.

          People seem to complain about NFS, but it's still the network file system I've had the least amount of problems with.

          Comment


          • #6
            A benchmark with rsize, wsize and nconnect would be great

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Archprogrammer View Post

              Yes.

              People seem to complain about NFS, but it's still the network file system I've had the least amount of problems with.
              Exactly. Also setting up NFS to use RDMA provided by InfiniBand was very easy.
              So for my home setup this was the obvious choice. All systems here are Linux.

              Also I have a hunch that Windows also supports NFS. Not so sure if it's as semless and painless as on all these *nix systems.
              Someone who knows can elaborate us more.

              Comment


              • #8
                NFS is supported on most windows, but the problem is user mapping, which is a real bother to set up. Samba shares are much easier that way. Also, samba is faster on my local 1gbit LAN on my server, but not by much.

                Comment


                • #9
                  For large data centres, something like Gluster.
                  Gluster and NFS are solving two different problems. Replicating with Gluster and then sharing it via NFS is what some companies do and shows you the purpose of both.

                  NFS is supported on most windows, but the problem is user mapping, which is a real bother to set up.
                  Adding the Linux boxes to your AD domain cures that problem quickly and easily. Don't like AD? FreeIPA is an answer as well.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jacob View Post

                    Probably no-one is using NFS unless they wish to have insecure, statically configured file sharing exclusively between *nix and/or Linux systems? I would guesstimate that at 99.99999999999% of the world's computer users.

                    For home/corporate networks, SMB and/or WebDav.
                    For large data centres, something like Gluster.
                    I'm a home user and I use NIS/autofs with nfs as the filesystem, works nice for linux and makes it a bit easier to handle multiple virtual machines as the config is now same for every machine. Can I even use SMB for homedirectory on linux ? And surely large system owners like uni/corps still use NFS I do not see why they should shift away from that.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X