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F2FS Gains Native SWAP File Support, Other Improvements

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  • F2FS Gains Native SWAP File Support, Other Improvements

    Phoronix: F2FS Gains Native SWAP File Support, Other Improvements

    F2FS is already very fast compared to the long-standing Linux file-systems when benchmarking on solid-state drives while for Linux 5.3 this file-system is getting in even better shape...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...Linux-5.3-Work

  • #2
    It would be better done an adequate resize.

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    • #3
      how to choose the kind of file system to install during the installation? Is it possible to use F2fs instad of ext4 for SSd?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
        how to choose the kind of file system to install during the installation? Is it possible to use F2fs instad of ext4 for SSd?
        Depends on the distro/installer. With Arch, for example, you have full control over how the disks are done.

        Hopefully, the next versions of more controlling distro installers will offer it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
          how to choose the kind of file system to install during the installation? Is it possible to use F2fs instad of ext4 for SSd?
          ask in your distro's forum

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
            how to choose the kind of file system to install during the installation? Is it possible to use F2fs instad of ext4 for SSd?
            If your distro provides bootstrap scripts, you might want to use those to set it up with your preferred file system.

            Also, if you want your boot partition to be F2FS, make sure your bootloader supports it. GNU GRUB 2.04 does, so you can try using that. If your distro is not bleeding edge, you might need to set that up yourself.

            I don't know whether F2FS support is directly in the kernel, or if it's provided as a module, so you might want to check whether your initramfs is set up properly.

            Right now, I'm waiting for official support for GNU GRUB 2.04 in Coreboot, as I've wanted to switch to F2FS myself for a while. I've used a setup where only the boot partition was EXT4 (and without a journal to speed it up). It was a slow thumb drive, so it was flash storage, and that file system felt like an major upgrade over EXT4 on it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
              If your distro provides bootstrap scripts, you might want to use those to set it up with your preferred file system.
              If his distro has "bootstrap scripts" he would not be asking here. He is probably using one of the MANY distro with a graphical and mostly automated installer.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                If his distro has "bootstrap scripts" he would not be asking here. He is probably using one of the MANY distro with a graphical and mostly automated installer.
                Debian is one of these distros, and it provides a bootstrap script.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
                  Debian is one of these distros, and it provides a bootstrap script.
                  It's not even remotely comparable to the graphical installer. It requires you to actually know the packages used in a default install.

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                  • #10
                    Swapping on a flash file-system, if actually used with flash RAM, does not sound like a good idea, given the wear any substantial swapping activity will cause.

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