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Linux 5.1.5 Kernel Fixes The Latest Data Corruption Bug

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  • #11
    Originally posted by shmerl View Post

    Doable, but I mean common installers (like Debian and the like) offer encryption with lvm by default. Any other setup would require manual method which is highly annoying (I tired Debian install making my own partitions, because I wanted to encrypt boot. It was a royal mess to do, so I gave up and went with default lvm with open boot, since I just didn't have time for it).
    Sure. I only wanted to point out that lvm isn't strictly necessary (at least in theory). I used to care about partitioning before SSDs, but now it just makes sense to have one large partition or maybe two, when using crypto.

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    • #12
      Funny thing is, Samsung SSDs support Opal, so you should probably just be using that instead - fi only it had better support in distros.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by linner View Post
        5.1 in general has been terrible for me. So buggy. The Radeon stuff is all kinds of messed up (corruption and hard system freezes). My laptop can no longer be suspended because if I do, it resets and corrupts the firmware. Going back to 5.0 fixes everything. I don't think 5.1 was really ready for release.
        been having screen lockup problems too with 5.1 though i can still ssh into it.
        have a vega 64.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by deadite66 View Post

          been having screen lockup problems too with 5.1 though i can still ssh into it.
          have a vega 64.
          No issues with 5.1.5 though. Vega 56.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by GreenReaper View Post
            Funny thing is, Samsung SSDs support Opal, so you should probably just be using that instead - fi only it had better support in distros.
            I don't really trust the integrated encryption, there seem to be quite a few attack vectors there.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
              People who unironically use LVM on desktops deserve it. It's a BIG waste of time, merely looking for LVM volumes can take 300ms, which is a LOT of time, as well as taking away critical iops needed to boot the system.

              LVM is bloat, and only makes sense in server setups.
              How do you RAID on desktop then?

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              • #17
                Originally posted by Buntolo View Post

                How do you RAID on desktop then?
                LVM has nothing to do with RAID. You'll probably want btrfs, zfs, or mdraid instead. mdraid != dm.

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                • #18
                  These articles have made me glad I'm a ZoL & BTRFS user (with an eye on bcachefs). I just prefer my tools to be more integrated and ZFS is the best in that regard; with BTRFS and bcachefs showing promise. At the end of the day I trust ZFS more than BTRFS and I trust either of those over volume layer + encryption layer + file system layer in whatever order a setup might require.

                  I've had all my Steam games and multimedia on a ZFS drive for three years now. Started as .6.x and is now .8.0 and I haven't had a single problem sticking with their point releases and rc's. Outside of the lackluster bootloader support that plagues all advanced setups from LVM2 to BTRFS to ZFS, it's a great file system and it has always kept my data safe through power outages, crashes, etc.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
                    People who unironically use LVM on desktops deserve it. It's a BIG waste of time, merely looking for LVM volumes can take 300ms, which is a LOT of time, as well as taking away critical iops needed to boot the system.

                    LVM is bloat, and only makes sense in server setups.
                    Many distros 'offer' LVM to users during install by default. Have to go 'manual' to avoid it.

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by aht0 View Post

                      many distros 'offer' lvm to users during install by default. Have to go 'manual' to avoid it.
                      a very big that.

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