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Linux 5.1.5 Kernel Fixes The Latest Data Corruption Bug

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  • Linux 5.1.5 Kernel Fixes The Latest Data Corruption Bug

    Phoronix: Linux 5.1.5 Kernel Fixes The Latest Data Corruption Bug

    For those concerned by the kernel's most recent data corruption bug involving LVM, dm-crypt, and Samsung SSD drive combinations leading to FSTRIM/Discard wiping too much data, the issue should be resolved in the newly-minted Linux 5.1.5 kernel...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...5.1.5-Released

  • #2
    No Samsung SSD is required to hit the bug.

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    • #3
      People who unironically use LVM on desktops deserve it. It's a BIG waste of time, merely looking for LVM volumes can take 300ms, which is a LOT of time, as well as taking away critical iops needed to boot the system.

      LVM is bloat, and only makes sense in server setups.

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      • #4
        Users can stay up to date with the latest kernel using jxself's linux-libre APT repository for Debian, Trisquel, Devuan, and similar Debian-derived systems: https://jxself.org/linux-libre/

        I received the 5.1.5 update already this morning.

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        • #5
          I had some problems with Bluetooth , devices connecting and disconnecting and I had to pair them every time in order to make them work.
          I wonder if that was fixed as well or maybe that was happening with only Manjaro kernels

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
            People who unironically use LVM on desktops deserve it. It's a BIG waste of time, merely looking for LVM volumes can take 300ms, which is a LOT of time, as well as taking away critical iops needed to boot the system.

            LVM is bloat, and only makes sense in server setups.
            It's also used by default for encrypted setup. Which is more than relevant for laptop users.
            Last edited by shmerl; 05-26-2019, 01:00 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wolfyrion View Post
              I had some problems with Bluetooth , devices connecting and disconnecting and I had to pair them every time in order to make them work.
              I wonder if that was fixed as well or maybe that was happening with only Manjaro kernels
              I've also had bluetooth issues for a few weeks.
              I thought it was related to the kernel but I rolled back to 5.0 and while better it was still not as good as a few months ago.
              Strangely some devices still connect fine, but others nope.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by shmerl View Post

                It's also use by default for encrypted setup. Which is more than relevant for laptop users.
                It's mainly useful if you need to use multiple encrypted partitions, but even then it's possible to set up crypto in a way that automates the mounting (LUKS + single password / pass key login). Besides, most laptops come with relatively small SSDs these days, and users rarely format the drive with more than 4 partitions. So.. even the old MBR partition layout is sufficient even if you only used primary partitions (MBR has the concept of extended partitions too). FWIW, old style partitions can also be resized etc.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by caligula View Post

                  It's mainly useful if you need to use multiple encrypted partitions, but even then it's possible to set up crypto in a way that automates the mounting (LUKS + single password / pass key login). Besides, most laptops come with relatively small SSDs these days, and users rarely format the drive with more than 4 partitions. So.. even the old MBR partition layout is sufficient even if you only used primary partitions (MBR has the concept of extended partitions too). FWIW, old style partitions can also be resized etc.
                  Doable, but I mean common installers (like Debian and the like) offer encryption with lvm by default. Any other setup would require manual method which is highly annoying (I tired Debian install making my own partitions, because I wanted to encrypt boot. It was a royal mess to do, so I gave up and went with default lvm with open boot, since I just didn't have time for it).

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                  • #10
                    5.1 in general has been terrible for me. So buggy. The Radeon stuff is all kinds of messed up (corruption and hard system freezes). My laptop can no longer be suspended because if I do, it resets and corrupts the firmware. Going back to 5.0 fixes everything. I don't think 5.1 was really ready for release.

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