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ZFS On Linux 0.8 Released With Native Encryption, TRIM, Device Removal

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  • ZFS On Linux 0.8 Released With Native Encryption, TRIM, Device Removal

    Phoronix: ZFS On Linux 0.8 Released With Native Encryption, TRIM, Device Removal

    The feature-packed and long-desired ZFS On Linux 0.8 release has finally taken place! ZoL 0.8 is out there!..

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...x-0.8-Released

  • #2
    Just got it compiled for my kernels without those pesky performance penalties. Glad I decided to wander over to Phoronix this afternoon.

    Hopefully someone will bring Grub's support up to .8. It sucks having to work around Grub when using ZoL and I'd like the option of boot environments.

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    • #3
      Sadly, the breaking patch has been backported to pretty much all stable Linux branches, so no matter what Kernel you use, if it's up to date, performance is bad.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BtbN View Post
        Sadly, the breaking patch has been backported to pretty much all stable Linux branches, so no matter what Kernel you use, if it's up to date, performance is bad.
        Luckily there's a patch for that patch so you can patch the patch to make it like you're not patched.

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        • #5
          It's here, nice. /drool

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          • #6
            Nice, now if Btrfs would get encription there will finally be an upgrade from LVM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
              Hopefully someone will bring Grub's support up to .8. It sucks having to work around Grub when using ZoL and I'd like the option of boot environments.
              Grub is shit, and kind of obsolete. Use any proper boot loader instead, is what I would recommend.

              Michael, at least make sure you include the previous branch as well in performance tests. 0.7.13 was the latest I think?
              Last edited by scineram; 05-24-2019, 02:10 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                Luckily there's a patch for that patch so you can patch the patch to make it like you're not patched.
                Most people does not recompile the kernel, you know.

                A usable "patch" would be to have that export as a dkms module, that is compiled independently and automatically like any other dkms module.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                  Most people does not recompile the kernel, you know.

                  A usable "patch" would be to have that export as a dkms module, that is compiled independently and automatically like any other dkms module.
                  A module is not gonna work. The patch changes kernel headers and needs to be applied before zfs is built.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    Most people does not recompile the kernel, you know.

                    A usable "patch" would be to have that export as a dkms module, that is compiled independently and automatically like any other dkms module.
                    Normally I'd agree, but this can't be made into a module. If it could the whole GPL Exports thing wouldn't have been a thing.


                    Originally posted by scineram View Post

                    Grub is shit, and kind of obsolete. Use any proper boot loader instead, is what I would recommend.
                    Name one that actually supports ZFS, all the ZFS features, and can be used on more than UEFI systems. That's a trick statement. You can't because it doesn't exist.

                    Oh, and feel free to replace ZFS with BTRFS because they're both in the same situation in regards to bootloaders supporting all of their features.

                    There are plenty of ways to do it when /boot is any other file system/on it's own drive. There is no way to go 100% "advanced feature filesystem" on Linux using a single disk without systemd-boot.

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