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Thunderbolt Is Seeing A Lot Of Improvements For Linux 5.2

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  • Thunderbolt Is Seeing A Lot Of Improvements For Linux 5.2

    Phoronix: Thunderbolt Is Seeing A Lot Of Improvements For Linux 5.2

    Adding to the excitement of the Linux 5.2 kernel changes are a lot of Thunderbolt improvements expected to be introduced in this next kernel cycle...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...underbolt-Work

  • #2
    Good thing Thunderbolt is going to be merged into USB 4 (or whatever the next version is called).

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    • #3
      Originally posted by shmerl View Post
      Good thing Thunderbolt is going to be merged into USB 4 (or whatever the next version is called).
      *USB4

      And it's a good thing. I'm still having nightmares about the USB 3.2x2=6.4 Gen2 or some shit names they chose.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by shmerl View Post
        Good thing Thunderbolt is going to be merged into USB 4 (or whatever the next version is called).
        What do you mean "merged"? Did I miss something major that's in the works?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by intelfx View Post

          What do you mean "merged"? Did I miss something major that's in the works?
          Literally merged. USB 4 will include not just USB and DisplayPort like USB-C now, but also PCIe like Thunderbolt. Intel decided it's time to stop pushing incompatible NIHs and opened Thunderbolt to be included in USB spec.

          See https://www.engadget.com/2019/03/04/...bolt-3-40gbps/

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          • #6
            Originally posted by shmerl View Post

            Literally merged. USB 4 will include not just USB and DisplayPort like USB-C now, but also PCIe like Thunderbolt. Intel decided it's time to stop pushing incompatible NIHs and opened Thunderbolt to be included in USB spec.

            See https://www.engadget.com/2019/03/04/...bolt-3-40gbps/
            I don't think that "incompatible NIH" is applicable to a technology that's one of a kind. As of now, there is nothing for Thunderbolt to be potentially compatible to. It's good that Thunderbolt will adopt open licensing, though.

            However, I'm slightly worried, how this "merger" is ever going to work? Does it mean that any device that's going to formally support USB4 will have to implement PCIe? That's not gonna happen.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by intelfx View Post
              However, I'm slightly worried, how this "merger" is ever going to work? Does it mean that any device that's going to formally support USB4 will have to implement PCIe? That's not gonna happen.
              Not any different from how USB-C works now. Not every device that uses USB-C supports DisplayPort. So I don't see how PCIe is any worse. Device can support a subset or all features - the connection is still the same.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by shmerl View Post
                Good thing Thunderbolt is going to be merged into USB 4 (or whatever the next version is called).
                I'm fairly certain the next iteration will be named USB 3.3 x2 +3 TurboSpeed v2. Once it's released, they will retroactively rename the previous versions of course. But to avoid consumer confusion, they will use the marketing names SuperSpeed, UltraSpeed, MegaSpeed, and SpeedySpeed to differentiate them.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by intelfx View Post
                  I don't think that "incompatible NIH" is applicable to a technology that's one of a kind. As of now, there is nothing for Thunderbolt to be potentially compatible to.
                  Wrong.
                  "Incompatible NIH" fits Intel's Thunderbolt because until they opened the spec the only available thunderbolt host controllers were designed by Intel and worked only on (some specific) Intel hardware. Sure you could connect any kind of client devices to your specific Intel hardware device.

                  Now that they opened the spec we might start seeing Thunderbolt host controllers that can run on AMD, or ARM or whatever else. Then and ONLY THEN we can talk of actual compatibility, standards and all that.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    *USB4

                    And it's a good thing. I'm still having nightmares about the USB 3.2x2=6.4 Gen2 or some shit names they chose.
                    They'll get to that in due time my good man

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