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Linux 5.1-rc4 Released - The Kernel Is Looking Good At Its Half-Way Point

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  • Linux 5.1-rc4 Released - The Kernel Is Looking Good At Its Half-Way Point

    Phoronix: Linux 5.1-rc4 Released - The Kernel Is Looking Good At Its Half-Way Point

    Linus Torvalds just announced the release of Linux 5.1-rc4 a few minutes ago as the latest weekly release candidate and just a few weeks out from the stable Linux 5.1 debut...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...1-rc4-Released

  • Charlie68
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post

    I meant that you can migrate the same Linux install from UEFI to Legacy boot without reinstalling.

    There is no need to reinstall the whole distro like you have to do with Windows (technically in Win10 there is a tool to do a live-upgrade from legacy to UEFI, but not the reverse).
    That wasn't the reason I had reinstalled, I reinstalled because I had to change hard disk.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
    I chose to install in legacy mode, because I read that my bios uefi has some bugs.
    I meant that you can migrate the same Linux install from UEFI to Legacy boot without reinstalling.

    There is no need to reinstall the whole distro like you have to do with Windows (technically in Win10 there is a tool to do a live-upgrade from legacy to UEFI, but not the reverse).

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlie68
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    I know it's too late but leaving this here for the future generations: migrating from UEFI to Legacy should not require a reinstall.

    Just boot SuperGrubDisk2 https://www.supergrubdisk.org/super-grub2-disk/ in UEFI or Legacy (whatever you want to migrate into), then scan for and boot your system, and then from there you can just uninstall GRUB and install the right kind of GRUB you need for UEFI or Legacy boot.
    Maybe I explained myself wrong, now everything works fine and the messages are gone, I chose to install in legacy mode, because I read that my bios uefi has some bugs. However now all is well. A greeting.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
    Among other things I had to reinstall, because I changed the hard disk and this time I chose the legacy mode, as I think my UEFI bios has some bugs too. Thanks a lot.
    I know it's too late but leaving this here for the future generations: migrating from UEFI to Legacy should not require a reinstall.

    Just boot SuperGrubDisk2 https://www.supergrubdisk.org/super-grub2-disk/ in UEFI or Legacy (whatever you want to migrate into), then scan for and boot your system, and then from there you can just uninstall GRUB and install the right kind of GRUB you need for UEFI or Legacy boot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlie68
    replied
    starshipeleven - Thanks to your suggestions, I managed to hide all the warnings, only do_IRQ remained: 2.55 No irq handler for vector, but that's ok. Among other things I had to reinstall, because I changed the hard disk and this time I chose the legacy mode, as I think my UEFI bios has some bugs too. Thanks a lot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlie68
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    I don't know if they are all warnings, here on Tumbleweed the kernel is set to be very chatty

    Code:
    sudo sysctl kernel.printk
    kernel.printk = 4 4 1 7
    the numbers mean this (from man klogctl):

    Code:
     console_loglevel
    Only messages with a log level lower than this value will be printed to the console. The default value for this field is DEFAULT_CONSOLE_LOGLEVEL (7), but it is set to 4 if the kernel command line contains the word "quiet", 10 if the kernel command line contains the word "debug", and to 15 in case of a kernel fault
    (the 10 and 15 are just silly, and equivalent to 8). The value of console_loglevel can be set (to a value in the range 1–8) by a syslog() call with a type of 8.
    
    default_message_loglevel
    This value will be used as the log level for printk() messages that do not have an explicit level. Up to and including Linux 2.6.38, the hard-coded default value for this field was 4 (KERN_WARNING); since Linux 2.6.39, the default value is a defined by the kernel configuration option CONFIG_DEFAULT_MESSAGE_LOGLEVEL,
    which defaults to 4.
    
    minimum_console_loglevel
    The value in this field is the minimum value to which console_loglevel can be set.
    
    default_console_loglevel
    This is the default value for console_loglevel.
    And the numbers mean this:

    Code:
     Kernel constant Level value Meaning
    KERN_EMERG 0 System is unusable
    KERN_ALERT 1 Action must be taken immediately
    KERN_CRIT 2 Critical conditions
    KERN_ERR 3 Error conditions
    KERN_WARNING 4 Warning conditions
    KERN_NOTICE 5 Normal but significant condition
    KERN_INFO 6 Informational
    KERN_DEBUG 7 Debug-level messages

    As you can see the kernel is set to print anything from Informational and below.

    Change the kernel.printk setting to show only errors and worse with
    sudo sysctl -w kernel.printk="4 4 1 4"

    If you want this on boot you should pass "loglevel=3" (or with a lower number) as a kernel command line argument (do this in the Bootloader settings from Yast).
    Apparently, "quiet" command line parameter should have the same effect of "loglevel=4", so at least the MODSIGN: Couldn't get UEFI db list that I also get on my system is an error, not a warning. (which imho should not be. I specifically disabled UEFI secure boot and UEFI db lists are unavailable, this is normal. )

    https://superuser.com/questions/3513...ing-my-console
    Thank you very much, as soon as I have some time I try.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlie68 View Post
    The worrying thing is that at each new version of the kernel a warning is added at boot time. Instead of decreasing the warnings increase and this is not good.
    I don't know if they are all warnings, here on Tumbleweed the kernel is set to be very chatty

    Code:
    sudo sysctl kernel.printk
    kernel.printk = 4       4       1       7
    the numbers mean this (from man klogctl):

    Code:
           console_loglevel
                  Only  messages with a log level lower than this value will be printed to the console.  The default value for this field is DEFAULT_CONSOLE_LOGLEVEL (7), but it is set to 4 if the kernel command line contains the word "quiet", 10 if the kernel command line contains the word "debug", and to 15 in case of a kernel fault
                  (the 10 and 15 are just silly, and equivalent to 8).  The value of console_loglevel can be set (to a value in the range 1–8) by a syslog() call with a type of 8.
    
           default_message_loglevel
                  This value will be used as the log level for printk() messages that do not have an explicit level.  Up to and including Linux 2.6.38, the hard-coded default value for this field was 4 (KERN_WARNING); since Linux 2.6.39, the default value is a defined by the kernel configuration option CONFIG_DEFAULT_MESSAGE_LOGLEVEL,
                  which defaults to 4.
    
           minimum_console_loglevel
                  The value in this field is the minimum value to which console_loglevel can be set.
    
           default_console_loglevel
                  This is the default value for console_loglevel.
    And the numbers mean this:

    Code:
           Kernel constant   Level value   Meaning
           KERN_EMERG             0        System is unusable
           KERN_ALERT             1        Action must be taken immediately
           KERN_CRIT              2        Critical conditions
           KERN_ERR               3        Error conditions
           KERN_WARNING           4        Warning conditions
           KERN_NOTICE            5        Normal but significant condition
           KERN_INFO              6        Informational
           KERN_DEBUG             7        Debug-level messages

    As you can see the kernel is set to print anything from Informational and below.

    Change the kernel.printk setting to show only errors and worse with
    sudo sysctl -w kernel.printk="4 4 1 4"

    If you want this on boot you should pass "loglevel=3" (or with a lower number) as a kernel command line argument (do this in the Bootloader settings from Yast).
    Apparently, "quiet" command line parameter should have the same effect of "loglevel=4", so at least the MODSIGN: Couldn't get UEFI db list that I also get on my system is an error, not a warning. (which imho should not be. I specifically disabled UEFI secure boot and UEFI db lists are unavailable, this is normal. )

    https://superuser.com/questions/3513...ing-my-console
    Last edited by starshipeleven; 04-08-2019, 06:51 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlie68
    replied
    The kernel 5 was a disaster for me, on my acer aspire E1-522 AMD notebook.
    Among the messages :
    do_IRQ: 1.55 No irq handler for vector
    [ 0.005472] do_IRQ: 2.55 No irq handler for vector
    [ 0.005472] do_IRQ: 3.55 No irq handler for vector
    Couldn't get size: 0x800000000000000e
    [ 6.736514] MODSIGN: Couldn't get UEFI db list
    [ 6.736727] Couldn't get size: 0x800000000000000e
    acpi PNP0C14:01: duplicate WMI GUID 05901221-D566-11D1-B2F0-00A0C9062910 (first i
    nstance was on PNP0C14:00)
    16.483775] systemd[1]: nss-lookup.target: Dependency Before=nss-lookup.target dropped
    ACPI Warning: SystemIO range 0x0000000000000B00-0x0000000000000B08 conflicts with
    OpRegion 0x0000000000000B00-0x0000000000000B0F (\_SB.PCI0.SMBS.SMB0) (20181213/utaddress-213)
    wdat_wdt wdat_wdt: can't request region for resource [mem 0xfec000f0-0xfec000f3]
    The only thing I can do is run a distribution that uses an old kernel, such as Leap 15 or Ubuntu 16.04, no problem.






    Leave a comment:


  • Charlie68
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    rc kernels are development kernels. Warnings will decrease when the final version is released. Use a non debug kernel to minimize kernel messages.
    I wasn't referring to kernel 5.1, I was referring to the last stable kernels, which increased warnings messages at boot time and at each new version instead of decreasing they increase.

    Leave a comment:

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