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  • #11
    Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post
    I don't think having more resources means you can get lazy and waste them to get the same thing done in a less efficient manner. When I upgrade, I want to be able to do things I couldn't before rather than being more or less on the same level with a new bloated Electron "app". I refuse to use a compositor, as I can't find a case where it makes things better, and that was the case even back in the day when I used a stacking window manager.
    Well, one of the things you can do that you couldn't before was have a display with a level of quality which competes with 400dpi paper print, for professional typographical work.

    You've made it clear that you don't care about that, and that's fine, but recognise that there are people who that matters to, so dismissing it as 'lazy' and 'wasteful' isn't helpful to the community at large. Criticising someone's decision making skills for getting a 13.3" 4k display laptop simply as retail therapy, while complaining that it doesn't get as good battery performance as the previous generation - that is helpful.

    I also avoided using a compositor for a long time. I started using it on my Acer Aspire One though, for 2 reasons. First, it lowered CPU usage which extended the battery life. Second, it lowered the volume of XDamage areas, which massively decreased the bandwidth required to access that machine via VNC. So there's 2 very good reasons for you to consider using a compositing manager. I used compton with all the shadows, transparency, and transitions disabled. On XFCE I have the compositor enabled for a single reason - accessibility. I have ketatoconus and because of that, in the early and late hours, I occasionally need the zoom feature to be able to read many poorly-designed UI elements of various apps and web pages. Momentarily using that zoom for a troublesome element is preferable to scaling the desktop fonts, applications or websites, which would result in a painful loss of desktop real-estate.

    I completely agree that Electron is a disgusting waste of resources. I also agree that GTK3 and everything built on it is a sad waste of resources, but the developers themselves have chosen it because they feel it is beneficial, and I am not prepared to fork their work to use a lighter toolkit, so that precludes me from the right to target them with armchair criticisms and tell them to make other decisions what they do in their own personal time. If I was hiring them, you can be certain I'd be directing them to avoid GTK3, at least for the next few years until GTK3 is 90% more likely to be in the pagecache than GTK2.










    Last edited by linuxgeex; 03-25-2019, 04:53 AM.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by linuxgeex View Post
      First, it lowered CPU usage which extended the battery life. Second, it lowered the volume of XDamage areas, which massively decreased the bandwidth required to access that machine via VNC.
      I assume switching to a tiling window manager should be enough to solve your issue. As for performance, it depends. I'd rather have some screen tearing and possible glitches in what I see to get 2% more performance out of my GPU.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post

        I assume switching to a tiling window manager should be enough to solve your issue. As for performance, it depends. I'd rather have some screen tearing and possible glitches in what I see to get 2% more performance out of my GPU.
        A tiling window manager can't meet my current needs - I'm doing web development on a 5k desktop but my acuity varies through the day so I need quite large fonts a lot of the time and that eats up the screen pretty quickly. My shells usually occupy 25% of the screen width right side of the display group, my editor occupies 50% and my browser occupies 60%, so there's inevitable overlap. Originally I used X's KP+- scaling and panning with a tiled layout. The problem there is I can't really choose which parts of which rectangles I want to be visible at the same time, which led to me changing the window layout several times per day. On the surface that doesn't sound bad, but in reality it seriously impairs round-trips when you don't always do the same thing and look the same way to get the same information. So with tiling I was losing one of the key intended benefits of tiling. I'll also point out that tiling and VNC are not friends for similar reasons. Just as my vision is bandwidth-constrained - so is VNC.

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