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Raspberry Pi Begins Rolling Out The Linux 4.19 Kernel

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  • Raspberry Pi Begins Rolling Out The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    Phoronix: Raspberry Pi Begins Rolling Out The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    The Raspberry Pi folks have been working the past few months on upgrading their kernel in moving from Linux 4.14 to 4.19. That roll-out has now begun...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...x-4.19-Rolling

  • #2
    I wonder when they are going to consider arm64 build stable enough for production. It will be funny if they release 2/4GB RAM RPi this year still without official arm64 builds.

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    • #3
      There is an official test thread for aarch64 on the forums:

      https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/v...?f=29&t=232684

      I guess Raspbian might move to a 64-bit kernel on capable boards some time in the future, while the userland will keep 32-bit ARMv6/v7 for compatibility reasons and to reduce memory pressure.

      There very likely won't be any 2/4 GB Raspberry Pis with the current SoC. They do not support more than 1 GB of RAM properly.

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      • #4
        Do they still work out of tree or have they finally come to their senses and started committing to upstream? I've been pressing the RPI foundation to do the sane thing and they always gave me bullshit reasons why they won't act like normal people.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RussianNeuroMancer View Post
          I wonder when they are going to consider arm64 build stable enough for production. It will be funny if they release 2/4GB RAM RPi this year still without official arm64 builds.
          They'd have to distribute two different builds of Raspbian, and deal with the volume of support requests from people trying to run 64-bit image on Pis <3. Unless they go to 4 GiB of RAM, those two issues greatly outweigh the advantages, and that's extremely unlikely to ever happen for Pi 3. Pi 4 is said to be very different to 1/2/3, so that might be the time to make a clean break. Of course you can quite happily run mainline aarch64 kernel with Arch, subject to limitations of missing drivers etc.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rmoog View Post
            Do they still work out of tree or have they finally come to their senses and started committing to upstream? I've been pressing the RPI foundation to do the sane thing and they always gave me bullshit reasons why they won't act like normal people.
            Why does Michael even bother writing anything past the headline? Clearly you didn't even skim his article.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by brrrrttttt View Post
              Why does Michael even bother writing anything past the headline? Clearly you didn't even skim his article.
              I checked it now, and the question I want to ask is... Why did I bother asking? Did I really expect RPI foundation to do the right thing and not rely on a kernel fork in production?
              The answer is "no". They are still forking the kernel instead of submitting their stuff upstream.

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              • #8
                It's not hard to understand why Raspberry Pi don't use an upstream kernel. Upstreaming is a slow process, and not everything might even be upstreamable (as in, upstream does not value/want the changes or additions). Most (all?) Raspberry Pi boards have upstream support, but it's not full-featured, for this reason.

                For instance the USB FIQ changes don't appear to be upstreamable, but they are vital for good and high performance USB support on the Pi.

                Anyway, I don't think it's an issue, Raspberry Pi are doing a great job with maintenance of an up to date kernel tree.
                Last edited by brent; 02-22-2019, 09:14 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rmoog View Post
                  Do they still work out of tree or have they finally come to their senses and started committing to upstream?
                  The raspberry pi 2 and 3 (when targeting 32bit) can use an older mainline kernel. Not sure about the pi 1.

                  I've been pressing the RPI foundation to do the sane thing and they always gave me bullshit reasons why they won't act like normal people.
                  It has been a **** show from the very start. It was understandable at launch in 2012. Five years later and they sold over 12 million units which just showed that they just did not give a **** about open source development. Due to the amount of proprietary code masked by firmware it's difficult to test and support the latest kernels. Over the years they have done work on releasing open source drivers for various components. I do commend the developers that have been working extremely hard on it. It's IMHO too little and it's not the developer's fault. The worst part of it all is that RPI foundation doesn't speak about it, so they will just give ******** excuses to prevent them from looking bad.

                  Raspberry pi support has been better than most smarthpones*, it still sucks. If the RPI foundation goes under who is going to support our devices? People love throwing things in the trash. Recycling is the major problem especially in "underdeveloped" countries which is what the raspberry pi targeted in the first place!

                  There's still some hope, the low cost will potentially allow talented and dedicated hackers to open up the device to a point where it can integrate with the latest open source software, but one should never depend on or plan for it to happen. Judging on the past, we can't depend on the RPI foundation for what we need.

                  *There are some smartphones that use good models but extremely hard to obtain or unaffordable.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by brrrrttttt View Post
                    They'd have to distribute two different builds of Raspbian, and deal with the volume of support requests from people trying to run 64-bit image on Pis <3. Unless they go to 4 GiB of RAM, those two issues greatly outweigh the advantages, and that's extremely unlikely to ever happen for Pi 3. Pi 4 is said to be very different to 1/2/3, so that might be the time to make a clean break. Of course you can quite happily run mainline aarch64 kernel with Arch, subject to limitations of missing drivers etc.
                    I haven’t been following PI development so I’m not sure what is going into that. However the sooner they move to 64 but the sooner they reap the long term benefits. That means a 32 bit solution and a 64 bit solution will have to be in play for a long time. I sorta understand 32 bit on older hardware but the reality is a good portion of the rest of the Linux world is solidly 64 bit.

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