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KASAN Spots Another Kernel Vulnerability From Early Linux 2.6 Through 4.20

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  • #41
    Originally posted by fuzz View Post

    LOL -- and yet it skyrocketed in the US. So , so great.
    If wishes were horses, beggars would fly.

    It's a world we live in. Can't have it all the way you personally want. Better be glad of what you have and where you, by chance, happened to born. Crushing majority of the population of planet Earth has it way worse. I'd be glad to be living in the U.S. Even though I cannot really complain either, Northern Europe is pretty nice, compared to some 3rd world shit holes, where 'luck' means inheriting position of prostitute from your deceased parent. And being without any such 'luck' is infinitely worse.

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    • #42
      Originally posted by aht0 View Post
      If wishes were horses, beggars would fly.

      It's a world we live in. Can't have it all the way you personally want. Better be glad of what you have and where you, by chance, happened to born. Crushing majority of the population of planet Earth has it way worse. I'd be glad to be living in the U.S. Even though I cannot really complain either, Northern Europe is pretty nice, compared to some 3rd world shit holes, where 'luck' means inheriting position of prostitute from your deceased parent. And being without any such 'luck' is infinitely worse.
      You are completely missing the point. The US spent significant resources in Afghanistan and more or less allowed, if not created, the opioid epidemic on its own soil. How is that an upside? The poor people who had to deal with these issues were not better off than anyone in any other country. Mindfulness is not quantifiable.

      Please learn more about the sad state of the heroin and opioid epidemic in the US before you protest.

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      • #43
        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        Really? I can give you few. First, after U.S invaded AFG and kicked the shit out of Taliban and terrorists had to retreat into high mountains - Heroin/Opium trade into Europe through Russia dropped to nearly nothing.
        Second. Good offense is the best defense. Always. It's better to fight on foreign soil than on your own. Between 9/11 (including it) and pulling combat troops out of AFG (2001-2014), U.S had about 18-19 Islamic-motivated terrorist attacks on U.S mainland. A lot? Well, between 2015-today, there's been about dozen more, which means 2/3 as many over just 4 years. It's open source information.
        Conclusion: it's better to wage war away from home, instead of counting dead among wreckage in your own cities.
        Well, nobody said you can't cherry-pick a few favorable bits. I was talking about the bigger picture, about which it seemed like you were previously speaking. If you tally up all the good you can find from that war, can you really say it was a net positive for the US? Enough to be worth all the blood and treasure that it cost? I sure can't.

        Even among these points you raised, Afghanistan opium production is now probably worse than ever. I think I read the Taliban actually frowned on it, before the US invasion, what with drugs being un-Islamic and all. And then there's all the heroin demand created in the US by opioid-addicted Afghan veterans. And that's not even speaking of all the other casualties.

        As far as terrorism goes, the US war on terror has created far more terrorists (and terror victims) than it killed. Though a nation has a right to defend the lives of its own citizens, you can't use that to justify loss of life of other innocents around the world, and that's exactly what these wars have caused. Even in the US mainland, we can't yet know the final outcome. An attack could still come at any time. Also, it's bizarre that you tie recent attacks in the US mainland to troop levels in Afghanistan. How many of those attacks were enabled, in any way, by that action?

        I'm not saying the Taliban shouldn't have been smacked for 9/11, but this idea that war and fear was a necessary good seems to ignore the reality.

        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        Fear, greed, thirst of power, religious convictions, sex drive, hatred - take your pick, combine any with any
        Fear is the easiest for autocrats to manufacture and manipulate. You cited popular fear of external threat as a positive influence, and I couldn't disagree more.

        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        Leaving idealism aside. Many countries do not have enough mature political culture. There's no other option than just getting one autocrat or other on top, one corrupt aparachnik or other et cetera. Our style of government requires few hundred years of preceding political tradition, specific accepted moral values and non-tribal attitude. People have to think of themselves as citizens of a country, not as members of a tribe x, y or z.
        I hope the last couple years has shown you how quickly even developed countries, like the US, can devolve into tribalism. I'm waiting to see just how far its "few hundred years of preceding political tradition, specific accepted moral values and non-tribal attitude" can unravel and be dismantled.

        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        Might as well then choose one autocrat aligning with our country's interests.
        Ever hear of "blow-back"? You know that the US once supported Islamists in Afghanistan, right? And the US supported Saddam, before it fought him. "Play with fire and you might get burnt", as the saying goes.

        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        We all have seen how experiment of "let's export democracy" ended up in Iraq. After first honest elections, winners (shia minority) did all they could to block kurds, sunnis etc from having any say or participation. It ended up with the rise of ISIS - which was created on the basis of same out-of-job sunni Iraqis.
        Dude, everyone knows Obama and Hillary created Isis.
        ; )

        Having a strongman sit atop a powder keg isn't as neat a solution as you make it seem. Just yesterday, I heard this report on how brutal authoritarian practices in Egypt have created a breeding ground for Isis:

        https://www.humanrightsfirst.org/blo...yptian-prisons

        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        There's no point trying to get democracy work in most African countries.
        Why is this even a point of debate? Without getting into the reasoning behind this point, I'm saying maybe it isn't for the US to decide how they should run their country. If you want to do business with them, fine. If not, also fine. But maybe it's not for the US to decide how they should be governed. The US doesn't have a great track record, here.

        Originally posted by aht0 View Post
        So, what would you prefer? U.S not having anything to do with 3/4 of the world and letting other, less scrupulous countries meddle as they wish?
        As if there's no middle ground? You can do trade and investment where it makes sense (which, it turns out, tend to be in better-run countries), without all of the meddling.

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        • #44
          Originally posted by fuzz View Post

          You are completely missing the point. The US spent significant resources in Afghanistan and more or less allowed, if not created, the opioid epidemic on its own soil. How is that an upside? The poor people who had to deal with these issues were not better off than anyone in any other country. Mindfulness is not quantifiable.

          Please learn more about the sad state of the heroin and opioid epidemic in the US before you protest.
          What do you specifically suggest Army, Marines, Rangers or God forbid, SpecOps should have done against domestic opioid abuse? Shoot the offenders exiting drug stores? Or have Force Recon operators determine drug dealers for any given city, have SpecOps arrest them over single night and Marines execute them in job lots at dawn? Your point remains unclear.

          Your domestic drug problem has very little to do with your armed forces foreign expeditions. Average middle-aged "Joe" or "Mary American" eat prescription drugs like candy. Doctors prescribe these drugs easily, often without patients condition even mandating any, even when just taking some time off and a breather would fix the initial issue.

          Fix your labour laws - and then situation would by itself start fixing lots of other problems with Americans health. And that would translate as much less money spent on social security and health care over time. Both use up hell of a lot more money than U.S military by itself does.
          U.S does not even have mandatory paid work leave - called 'vacation'. Not to mention federal requirement for paid sick leave, Jesus. No wonder American people keep working themselves sick, then try to keep going on prescription drugs awhile longer and eventually, would end up being prescription drug addicts or using real drugs as supplements. Handful of pills over the morning to get going, same before going to sleep. Day in, day out. Year after year. 3 weeks are enough to acquire mild addiction from opioid-based pain killer.

          Military, despite what libertarians like to believe, is necessity. Nobody takes "paper tiger", based on pure economic power, seriously. Just look at European Union. Russia does whatever the fuck it wants in EU's back yard and would spit on endless EU's "we are gravely concerned"-statements after each fresh incident. Because EU does not have military nor willingness to use it - even if it had good military. And Russians know it and can just ignore the EU toothless squeaks.
          While single U.S destroyer anchored in Crimean peninsula in support of Ukrainians would have made Russia back off from annexing the peninsula back in 2014. US Navy demonstrating support for Georgians back in 2008 sure as hell made Russian forces suddenly stop it's drive towards Tbilisi. That's how military can be used for achieving the diplomatic goals even without going into actual conflict. But you have to have it's potential at hand, have to have used it before and your adversaries have to know you are willing to fucking use your military if need be. Diplomacy is just that - military AND economic might dressed behind civil behaviour and smooth talk of diplomats.

          What would you like? Isolationism? Troops at home and no wars abroad? American official isolationism-policy over 1920-30's eventually led to WW2. Is WW3 what you want?

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          • #45
            Originally posted by aht0 View Post
            What do you specifically suggest Army, Marines, Rangers or God forbid, SpecOps should have done against domestic opioid abuse? Shoot the offenders exiting drug stores? Or have Force Recon operators determine drug dealers for any given city, have SpecOps arrest them over single night and Marines execute them in job lots at dawn? Your point remains unclear.

            Your domestic drug problem has very little to do with your armed forces foreign expeditions. Average middle-aged "Joe" or "Mary American" eat prescription drugs like candy. Doctors prescribe these drugs easily, often without patients condition even mandating any, even when just taking some time off and a breather would fix the initial issue.
            You completely changed the context of the argument. Individual armed forces have nothing to do with it.

            The point is the US government knows it's a problem and even allows it to occur. You do not need to explain the poor healthcare system to people who live with it every day. But feel free to continue to pretend you know everything and everyone else knows nothing.

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