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Linux 5.0 File-System Benchmarks: Btrfs vs. EXT4 vs. F2FS vs. XFS

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  • Mario Junior
    replied
    It would be nice to see how the numbers look with the latest stable version of the kernel Michael

    Leave a comment:


  • AuroraTea
    replied
    May I ask why the test object is the file system of Linux 5.1, and the use is Linux 4.20.0-999? Is this 999 another mystery?

    This is a beginner student of Linux. Sorry if I offended.

    Leave a comment:


  • snoooit
    replied
    It would be nice if you add jfs back into the benchmark.

    Leave a comment:


  • nibnook
    replied
    I noticed on several BTRFS on LVM on LUKS volumes, when I enabled Ztsd compression for BTRFS, it performed substantially better. Faster than previous ext4 volumes. With modern CPUs compression is so fast that it increases throughput over uncompressed. It also provided ~50% better capacity on a 256gb ssd. It would be interesting to see BTRFS Ztsd added to the test.

    Leave a comment:


  • S.Pam
    replied
    COW filesystems are quite affected by small updates. Default really ought to be mounted noatime, nodiratime

    Leave a comment:


  • Mario Junior
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    Patches of new test profiles/scripts always welcome for inclusion.
    Hi Michael, how are you? I would like to ask you something: could you retest the latest versions of file systems as well as the kernel and make a new comparison including Ubuntu's ZFS?

    Thanks in advance!

    Leave a comment:


  • lsatenstein
    replied
    Is it possible in the future to show the fstab entries for the file systems being tested. I would like to see the tests done without encryption, so as to isolate the FS from the encryption overhead. I use default,relatime for all my SSD partitions.

    It would be great as well, if we could see tests with a 50gig partition, which is 50% full, and a 500 gig partition, also 50% full.
    If I read it right, a MongoDB test of ext4 vs xfs showed that ext4 performs great for smaller partitions (files) and xfs performs better for larger partitions(files).
    It would help if the tests were done with Sata SSDs and with M.2 SSDs (1 terrabyte sizes for each)

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by gregzeng View Post

    Use a post-it note, then stick the note near your computer screen. Very secure. I bet!
    That's usually done in workplaces where the employee does not give a shit and the password is just a thing imposed by the IT department. For things that the user wants to keep secure, much less.

    Leave a comment:


  • gregzeng
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    There is a thing called pen that you can use on another thing called paper, which will allow you to write down stuff.
    Use a post-it note, then stick the note near your computer screen. Very secure. I bet!

    Leave a comment:


  • phuclv
    replied
    Originally posted by elatllat View Post
    Anyone technically competent is encrypting their data, for numorus reasons.
    competent about what? Many technology and cyber security companies aren't even encrypting their desktops and I bet they're competent enough
    encryption is not something special that requires specific knowledge to use. Any layman can just search and enable bitlocker on Windows in minutes

    Leave a comment:

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